Airtel (FBI)

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Airtel is an outdated data communication process used internally within the FBI in addition to Teletype and facsimile. It indicates a letter that must be typed and mailed on the same day.[1]

The FBI official abbreviation for airtel is A/T.[2]

Airtels are indexed automatically by a ZyIndex searchable database, which stores and retrieves full text documents.[3]

Airtels are marked by precedence: immediate, priority, or routine. They are also marked by classification: top secret, secret, confidential, unclassified EFTO (Encrypted For Transmission Only), and unclassified.

The inefficiencies inherent in the FBI's use of airtels led to an investigation conducted by the Office of the Inspector General of the FBI that culminated in the 2002 report entitled "An Investigation of the Belated Production of Documents in the Oklahoma City Bombing Case."[4]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ O'Reilly, Kenneth (May 1988). "The FBI and the Civil Rights Movement during the Kennedy Years--from the Freedom Rides to Albany". The Journal of Southern History (Southern Historical Association) 54 (2): 201–232. doi:10.2307/2209399. ISSN 0022-4642. OCLC 4891878547. 
  2. ^ "FBI Abbreviations". JFK Assassination Records. National Archives and Records Administration. Retrieved 26 February 2013. 
  3. ^ Office of the Inspector General (March 19, 2002). "Document Management in the FBI". An Investigation of the Belated Production of Documents in the Oklahoma City Bombing Case. United States Department of Justice. 
  4. ^ Office of the Inspector General (March 19, 2002). "Executive Summary". An Investigation of the Belated Production of Documents in the Oklahoma City Bombing Case. United States Department of Justice. 

References[edit]

  • Schneier, Bruce; Banisar, David (1997). The Electronic Privacy Papers. New York: Wiley. ISBN 9780471122975.