Aivars Gipslis

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Aivars Gipslis
Aivars Gipslis.jpg
Aivars Gipslis
Full name Aivars Gipslis
Country Latvia
Born (1937-02-08)February 8, 1937
Died April 13, 2000(2000-04-13) (aged 63)
Title Grandmaster (1967)
ICCF Grandmaster
Peak rating 2580 (July 1971)

Aivars Gipslis (February 8, 1937 – April 13, 2000) was a Latvian chess FIDE Grandmaster and also an ICCF Grandmaster,[1] and a chess writer.

Chess biography[edit]

Born in Riga, he was champion of Latvia in 1955, 1956, 1957, 1960, 1961, 1963, 1964, and 1966. He also played in several Soviet Chess Championships, his best result coming in 1966, when he was equal third with 12/20. Gipslis played in the Sousse Interzonal of 1967, but did not advance to the Candidates' level. Perhaps his best tournament result was the Alekhine Memorial 1967 in Moscow, where he finished on 10/17, a point behind the winner Leonid Stein. His second place was shared with Milko Bobotsov and two World Champions, Vasily Smyslov and Mikhail Tal, ahead of two others, Boris Spassky and Tigran Petrosian, among a host of other strong players. His other outstanding tournament results include equal first at Bad Liebenstein 1963 with Lev Polugaevsky, and equal second at Budapest 1977 behind David Bronstein. Drink affected his performance in later years, but he continued to play right up to the year of his death.[2]

Gipslis became a Grandmaster in 1967. He edited the Latvian chess periodical Šahs from 1963.

Team competitions[edit]

Gipslis played for USSR in the World Student Team Chess Championships of 1957, 1958 and 1959[3] and in the European Team Chess Championship of 1970.[4] He played for Latvia in the World Team Chess Championship of 1993.[5]

Openings[edit]

With the white pieces, he most frequently opened 1.e4. His repertoire with Black was more varied. He is the eponym of the Gipslis Variation of the Sicilian Defence which he played the Black side of several times in the 1960s: 1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 e6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 a6 5.Bd3 Nf6 6.0-0 d6 7.c4 g6.

Notable games[edit]

References[edit]

Notes

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ (Hooper & Whyld 1992:153)
  3. ^ Bartelski, Wojciech. "World Student Team Chess Championship: Aivars Gipslis". OlimpBase. Retrieved 14 November 2011. 
  4. ^ Bartelski, Wojciech. "European Men's Team Chess Championship: Aivars Gipslis". OlimpBase. Retrieved 14 November 2011. 
  5. ^ Bartelski, Wojciech. "World Men's Team Chess Championship: Aivars Gipslis". OlimpBase. Retrieved 14 November 2011. 

Bibliography

External links[edit]