Akseki

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For other places with the same name, see Akseki (disambiguation).
Akseki
Akseki is located in Turkey
Akseki
Akseki
Coordinates: 37°03′07″N 31°47′03″E / 37.05194°N 31.78417°E / 37.05194; 31.78417Coordinates: 37°03′07″N 31°47′03″E / 37.05194°N 31.78417°E / 37.05194; 31.78417
Country Turkey
Province Antalya
Government
 • Mayor Mehmet Gölcü (CHP)
 • Kaymakam Mekan Çeviren
Area[1]
 • District 1,285.43 km2 (496.31 sq mi)
Population (2012)[2]
 • Urban 3,637
 • District 13,122
 • District density 10/km2 (26/sq mi)
Website www.akseki.bel.tr

Akseki is a town and district of Antalya Province in the Mediterranean region of Turkey. According to 2010 census, population of the district is 15,912 of which 3,441 live in the town of Akseki.

Known for its snowdrops, Akseki is located in the western Taurus Mountains at an elevation of 1500m. The Manavgat River passes through a large valley in the centre of the district, which is otherwise mainly mountainous. Places of interest include caves, valleys and a number of high meadows. This windswept rocky mountainside is not good farmland and the local economy mostly depends on forestry and raising sheep and cattle. Many people from Akseki have migrated to Antalya but still have homes here as an escape from the summer heat on the coast. The people of Akseki have a reputation as canny traders, and some prominent businessman were brought up here including restaurateur and fruit-juice producer Ömer Duruk.

Akseki was formerly Byzantine town of Marla, Marulya, or Marulia. It was conquered by the Seljuk Turks and the Ottoman Empire along with other towns in the area.

Antalya's Akdeniz University has a branch here training nurses, and doing some other vocational training.

With its rich architectural heritage, Akseki is a member of the Norwich-based European Association of Historic Towns and Regions.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Area of regions (including lakes), km²". Regional Statistics Database. Turkish Statistical Institute. 2002. Retrieved 2013-03-05. 
  2. ^ "Population of province/district centers and towns/villages by districts - 2012". Address Based Population Registration System (ABPRS) Database. Turkish Statistical Institute. Retrieved 2013-02-27. 
  3. ^ The European Association of Historic Towns and Regions - Turkey

External links[edit]