Al-Hadi School of Accelerative Learning

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Coordinates: 29°44′32″N 95°30′01″W / 29.7421°N 95.5002°W / 29.7421; -95.5002

Islamic Education Center in Houston, which houses Al-Hadi

The Al-Hadi School of Accelerative Learning is an Islamic primary and secondary school in Southwest Houston, Texas.[1] The school is located on the premises of the Islamic Education Center of Greater Houston (IEC) of Houston, which also houses one of the largest Shia mosques in Houston.[2] According to Fahem Kalzimi, the chairperson of the IEC, it is a Houston-area school that runs on tuition fees that comes from the students ranging to $500.[3] The school is near Westheimer Road.[4]

History[edit]

The Alavi Foundation, a charitable Islamic foundation headquartered in New York City, purchased the property that would become the IEC for $1.1 million in 1988.[4] In March 1995 a "Full-Time School Committee" formed with the intent of establishing a year-round Islamic primary and secondary school in Greater Houston. The Al-Hadi School opened on January 9, 1996.[5] Between 1997 and 2004 the Alavi Foundation made $285,000 worth of improvements to the IEC property.[4] In 2001 the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools accredited the school. The first class of high school seniors graduated in 2003.[5]

In 2009 the Federal Government of the United States attempted to seize over $500 million in assets from the Alavi Foundation, accusing the foundation of being a front for the Government of Iran. The IEC, including Al-Hadi School, was among the assets. The IEC property had a brief mention in the federal lawsuit. The federal government did not file any allegations of wrongdoing of workers and worshippers at the IEC mosque. Houston-area Shia Muslims criticized the federal government's actions.[4] As the federal lawsuit unfolded, the Islamic school continued to operate.[3]

Demographics[edit]

As of 2010, about 300 students attend the school. Most of the students are bilingual, with several languages represented in the student body.[1]

In 2007 the school had 310 students. Most of the students were Shia. About 25% of the students were Sunni, and two families sending children to the school were not Muslim.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "School Profile." Al-Hadi School of Accelerative Learning. Retrieved on October 4, 2010.
  2. ^ "US Govt move to seize 4 mosques, tower linked to Iran." Indian Express. Friday November 13, 2009. Retrieved on October 4, 2010.
  3. ^ a b Watkins, Andrea and Alexander Supgul. "Business as Usual at Islamic School." KRIV-TV. Friday November 13, 2009. Retrieved on October 4, 2010.
  4. ^ a b c d Mendoza, Moises, Mary Flood and Lindsay Wise. "Muslims decry move to seize Houston mosque." Houston Chronicle. November 13, 2009. Retrieved on October 4, 2010.
  5. ^ a b "Our History." Al-Hadi School of Accelerative Learning. Retrieved on October 4, 2010.
  6. ^ Karkabi, Barbara. "The two faces of Islam." February 24, 2007. Retrieved on May 3, 2014.

External links[edit]