Al-Qaidah (newspaper)

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This article is about Iraqi newspaper. For militant group, see Al-Qaeda.
Al-Qaidah
Founded January 1943
Political alignment Communist
Language Arabic
Ceased publication June 19, 1956 (1956-06-19)
Circulation ~5,400 (as at 1954–55)

Al-Qaidah (Arabic: القاعدة‎, The Base) was a newspaper published in Iraq. It was an organ of the Iraqi Communist Party.[1][2] It was printed clandestinely for thirteen years, albeit with interruptions.[3]

The first issue of al-Qaidah came out in January 1943. Al-Qaidah was founded in the midst of a split in the party.[3][4] It was set up by Yusuf Salman Yusuf (Fahd)'s three supporters in the party Central Committee: Daud as-Sayegh, Hussain Muhammad ash-Shabibi and Zaki Muhammad Basim. The newspaper sought to compete with ash-Shararah ('The Spark') for the position as the party organ. Effectively the different factions were known by the names of their publications.[4] As-Sayegh served as editor of al-Qaidah before being expelled from the party.[5]

Al-Qaidah was banned by the government, and being caught with an issue of the newspaper could result in a prison sentence.[6] By 1947 al-Qaidah had a circulation of around 3,000.[1] It was probably one of the most widely-read newspapers in the country at the time.[7] It was primarily read in Baghdad, the Shiite south and the Kurdish north.[1] During 1954–55, seventeen issues of al-Qaidah were published. In spite of being an illegal underground publication, its issues had an average circulation of around 5,400.[8]

In 1955 a workers newspaper, Ittihad ul-Amal was founded after which al-Qaidah began focusing more on agrarian issues.[9]

Al-Qaidah was shut down as the party reconciled with the Rayat ash-Shaghilah ('Toilers Banner') group, and Ittihad ash-Sha'ab ('People's Union') was founded as the new party organ.[3][10][11] The last issue was published on June 19, 1956.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Elizabeth F. Thompson (15 April 2013). Justice Interrupted. Harvard University Press. p. 191. ISBN 978-0-674-07609-9. 
  2. ^ Вадим Васильевич Кортунов (1983). Справочник пропагандиста-международника. Политиздат. p. 189. 
  3. ^ a b c Вестник Московского университета: Журналистика. Изд-во Московского Университета. 1972. p. 55. 
  4. ^ a b Tareq Y. Ismael (2008). The Rise and Fall of the Communist Party of Iraq. Cambridge University Press. p. 28. ISBN 978-0-521-87394-9. 
  5. ^ Ṣalāḥ Khurasān (1993). Safhat min tarikh al-harikah al-shuyuìyah fi al-Ìraq. 
  6. ^ Sasson Somekh (2012). Life After Baghdad: Memoirs of an Arab-Jew in Israel, 1950–2000. Sussex Academic Press. p. 10. ISBN 978-1-84519-502-1. 
  7. ^ Bassam Yousif (17 June 2013). Human Development in Iraq: 1950–1990. Routledge. p. 63. ISBN 978-1-136-61986-1. 
  8. ^ Johan Franzén (2011). Red Star Over Iraq: Iraqi Communism Before Saddam. Hurst Publishers. p. 23. ISBN 978-1-84904-101-0. 
  9. ^ Tareq Y. Ismael (2008). The Rise and Fall of the Communist Party of Iraq. Cambridge University Press. p. 57. ISBN 978-0-521-87394-9. 
  10. ^ Johan Franzén (2011). Red Star Over Iraq: Iraqi Communism Before Saddam. Hurst Publishers. p. 69. ISBN 978-1-84904-101-0. 
  11. ^ a b Tareq Y. Ismael (2008). The Rise and Fall of the Communist Party of Iraq. Cambridge University Press. pp. 60–61. ISBN 978-0-521-87394-9.