Al-Qudaibiya Palace

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Al-Qudaibiya Palace
Al-Qudaibiya Palace is located in Manama
Al-Qudaibiya Palace
General information
Type Palace
Town or city Manama
Country Bahrain
Coordinates 26°13′1″N 50°35′31″E / 26.21694°N 50.59194°E / 26.21694; 50.59194

Al-Qudaibiya Palace or Gudaibiya Palace is a palace in Gudaibiya, Manama, Bahrain. Located off Bani Otbah Avenue and Al Fatih Highway, it lies west of the Al Fateh Grand Mosque and southwest of the Old Palace of Manama and the Andalus Garden and Manama Cemetery. It is a light pink palace with a pearl-coloured, onion-shaped dome.[1] For decades the palace has hosted some of the most important political and economy-related conferences in the country, having a prominent role in the foreign affairs of the country.[2][3]The proclamation of the accession of Salman Al Khalifa, after his father's death in February 1942 was made from the steps of the Gudaibiya Palace, read by the ruler's uncle, Shaikh Mohammad bin Isa.[4] It has a major political function; the King's cabinet usually meets every Sunday at the palace and Prime Minister Khalifa bin Salman Al Khalifa has an office at the palace.[1]

The landscaping of the Gudaibiya Palace grounds was carried out, between September 2007 and September 2008, by the Ministry of Works.[5]

During the 2011 unrest in Bahrain, thousands protested outside the palace from February 14, with demonstrators waving flags and chanting "Down Hamad! Down Hamad!", in reference to Bahrain's King Hamad.[1] Others shouted "Hey Khalifa, get out! Get out!" in reference to the Prime Minister Sheikh Khalifa bin Salman Al Khalifa.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Thousands gather outside Bahrain palace". Telegraph. 6 March 2011. Retrieved 9 May 2011. 
  2. ^ Foreign affairs Pakistan. Pakistan, Ministry of Foreign Affairs. 1996. p. 14. Retrieved 9 May 2011. 
  3. ^ Pakistan & Gulf economist. Published by S. Akhtar Ali, for and on behalf of Economist Publications. 1 January 1983. Retrieved 9 May 2011. 
  4. ^ Wheatcroft, Andrew (4 January 1988). Bahrain in original photographs, 1880-1961. Kegan Paul International. ISBN 978-0-7103-0206-9. Retrieved 9 May 2011. 
  5. ^ "Gudaibiya Palace Landscaping". 

External links[edit]

View of Gudaibiya Palace, residence of the Prime Minister