Al-Ramhormuzi

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Buzurg Ibn Shahriyar of Ramhormuz, was a Muslim traveler, sailor, cartographer and geographer. He was born in the Khuzistan in Persia. On the year 953 he had completed a collection of narratives from Muslim sailors ased in Siraf, Oman, Basra and elsewhere.[1]

In his works he mentions how Muslim seafarers traveled to India, Malaysia, Indonesia, China and East Africa. He mentions various links between the Abbasid Caliphate and Tang dynasty, China.

Narrative[edit]

Conversion of the Raja of Ra[edit]

According to the narrative of Abu Muhammad al-Hassan Hammawiyah al-Najiramy, a Raja of India named Mahruk son of Raiq of Ra lived in a country between upper and lower Kashmir requested a copy of the Quran from the Muslim Amir of Mansura (Brahmanabad), Abdullah ibn Umar ibn Abd al-Aziz. The ruler had secretly converted to Islam and requested the Muslim envoy to stay in his court for 3 years and paid 600 mann of Gold on three occasions.

Andaman Islands[edit]

The Persian navigator Al-Ramhormuzi, in his 10th century book Ajaib al-Hind (The wonders of India) described the islands as being inhabited by fierce cannibalistic tribes. The book also mentions an island he called Andaman al-Kabir (Great Andaman).[2][3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.muslimheritage.com/topics/default.cfm?TaxonomyTypeID=6&TaxonomySubTypeID=43&TaxonomyThirdLevelID=292&ArticleID=560
  2. ^ Adhir Chakravarti, Narendra Nath Bhattacharyya (1998). India and South-East Asia Socio-Econo-Cultural Contacts: Socio-econo-cultural Contacts. Punthi Pustak. ISBN 81-86791-14-0. Retrieved 2008-11-16. "... The Ajaib al- Hind of Buzurg (c. AD 1000) mentions an island named Andaman al-Kabir ..." 
  3. ^ Buzurg ibn Shahriyar, translated by: L. Marcel Devic and Peter Quennell (1928). The Book of the Marvels of India: from the Arabic. G. Routledge & sons