Alan Heathcock

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Alan Heathcock reading in Boise, Idaho (2013)

Alan Heathcock (born March 8, 1971) is an American fiction writer. He grew up in the Chicago suburb of Hazelcrest, Illinois and attended the University of Iowa, where he graduated in 1993 with a BA in Journalism. Heathcock earned MFAs from both Bowling Green State University (1996), and Boise State University (2003), where he continues to teach creative writing workshops.He lives in Boise, Idaho with his wife and three children.

Heathcock's first collection of short fiction, VOLT,[1] was published with Graywolf Press in 2011.[2] VOLT was selected as an Editor's Pick for both the The New York Times Book Review[3] and The Oxford American;[4] a finalist for the Barnes & Noble Discover Award,[5] as well as hailed by many critics as one of the best books of 2011, including Publishers Weekly,[6] the Chicago Tribune,[7] Salon.com,[8] and GQ.[9] VOLT also includes the story "Peacekeeper,"[10] which first appeared in the Fall 2005 issue of the Virginia Quarterly Review, and won Heathcock a National Magazine Award in 2006.[11]

Awards[edit]

Whiting Award (2012)[12]
Boise Weekly Best Living Idaho Writer (2012)[13]
Spinetinglers Magazine, Best Short Story Collection (2012)[14]
GLCA New Writers Award (2012)[15]
Bread Loaf Writers' Conference, Shane Stevens Fellowship in Fiction (2011)[16]
Tin House Writers' Conference, Scholar (2010)
Bread Loaf Writers' Conference, Carol Houck Fellowship in Fiction (2009)[17]
National Magazine Award, Fiction (2006)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "volt alan heathcock". Amazon.com. Retrieved October 14, 2013. 
  2. ^ Seshadri, Vijay. "Home". Graywolf Press. Retrieved October 14, 2013. 
  3. ^ "Stories of Small-Town Strife". The New York Times. Retrieved October 14, 2013. 
  4. ^ "BOOK REVIEW: Alan Heathcock :: Oxford American – The Southern Magazine of Good Writing". Oxford American. March 28, 2012. Retrieved October 14, 2013. 
  5. ^ Hales, Dianne R. (February 1, 2012). "Announcing the 2011 Discover Great New Writers Awa... – The Barnes & Noble Review". Bnreview.barnesandnoble.com. Retrieved October 14, 2013. 
  6. ^ "Best Books 2011". Publishers Weekly. September 11, 2001. Retrieved October 14, 2013. 
  7. ^ "Best books 2011". chicagotribune.com. Retrieved October 14, 2013. 
  8. ^ Mustich, Emma (December 9, 2011). "Writers choose their favorite books of 2011". Salon.com. Retrieved October 14, 2013. 
  9. ^ "GQ's Punch List: The Year in Reading 2011". Listal.com. December 30, 2011. Retrieved October 14, 2013. 
  10. ^ "VQR » Peacekeeper". Vqronline.org. Retrieved October 14, 2013. 
  11. ^ "Winners & Finalists | ASME". Magazine.org. Retrieved October 14, 2013. 
  12. ^ "Mrs. Giles Whiting Foundation". Whitingfoundation.org. Retrieved October 14, 2013. 
  13. ^ "Best Living Idaho Writer 2012". Boiseweekly.com. Retrieved October 14, 2013. 
  14. ^ "2012 Spinetingler Awards – WINNERS « Spinetingler". Spinetinglermag.com. May 1, 2012. Retrieved October 14, 2013. 
  15. ^ "Boise's Alan Heathcock chosen as the Great Lakes Colleges Association's new fiction writer of 2012". Voices.IdahoStatesman.com. December 31, 1969. Retrieved October 14, 2013. 
  16. ^ "Bread Loaf Writers' Conference 2011". Middlebury.edu. Retrieved October 14, 2013. 
  17. ^ "bread loaf – UPDATE". News.boisestate.edu. August 13, 2009. Retrieved October 14, 2013. 

External links[edit]