Alan T. Waterman Award

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The Alan T. Waterman Award is the United States's highest honorary award for scientists no older than 35. It is awarded on a yearly basis by the National Science Foundation. In addition to the medal, the awardee receives a grant of $1,000,000 to be used at the institution of their choice over a period of five years for advanced scientific research.

History of the Award[edit]

Congress established the annual award in August 1975 to mark the 25th Anniversary of the National Science Foundation and to honor its first Director, Alan T. Waterman. The annual award recognizes an outstanding young researcher in any field of science or engineering supported by the National Science Foundation. [1]

Eligibility and nomination process[edit]

Candidates must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents and must be 35 years of age or younger or not more than 7 years beyond receipt of the Ph.D. degree by December 31 of the year in which they are nominated. Candidates should have demonstrated exceptional individual achievements in scientific or engineering research of sufficient quality to place them at the forefront of their peers. Criteria include originality, innovation, and significant impact on the field. Potential candidates must be nominated and require four letters of reference, but none can be submitted from the nominee’s home institution. Solicitation announcements are sent to universities and colleges, scientific, engineering and other professional societies and organizations, members of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering.

Award process and committee composition[edit]

Candidates are reviewed by the Alan T. Waterman Award committee, which is made up of 12 members, 8 rotators and 4 members ex officio. The current ex officio members are Ralph Cicerone, President of the National Academy of Sciences, Subra Suresh, Director of the National Science Foundation, Steven C. Beering, Chairman of the National Science Board, and Charles M. Vest, President of the National Academy of Engineering. After review of the nominees, the Committee recommends the most outstanding candidate(s) to the Director of the National Science Foundation and the National Science Board, which then makes the final determination.

List of recipients[edit]

2014 
Feng Zhang
2013 
Mung Chiang
2012 
Scott Aaronson
2012 
Robert Wood
2011 
Casey W. Dunn
2010 
Subhash Khot
2009 
David Charbonneau
2008 
Terence Tao
2007 
Peidong Yang
2006 
Emmanuel Candes
2005 
Dalton Conley
2004 
Kristi Anseth
2003 
Angelika Amon
2002 
Erich Jarvis
2001 
Vahid Tarokh
2000 
Jennifer A. Doudna
1999 
Chaitan Khosla
1998 
Christopher C. Cummins
1997 
Eric Allin Cornell
1996 
Robert M. Waymouth
1995 
Matthew P.A. Fisher
1994 
Gang Tian
1993 
Deborah L. Penry
1992 
Shrinivas R. Kulkarni
1991 
Herbert Edelsbrunner
1990 
Mark E. Davis
1989 
Richard H. Scheller
1988 
Peter Schultz
1987 
Lawrence H. Summers
1986 
Edward Witten
1985 
Jacqueline Barton
1984 
Harvey Friedman
1983 
Corey S. Goodman
1982 
Richard Axel
1981 
W. Clark Still
1980 
Roy Schwitters
1979 
William Thurston
1978 
Richard A. Muller
1977 
J. William Schopf
1976 
Charles Fefferman

References[edit]

External links[edit]