Albert Barnes Anderson

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Albert Barnes Anderson (February 10, 1857 – April 27, 1938) was a United States federal judge.

Born in Zionsville, Indiana, Anderson received an A.B. from Wabash College in 1879 and read law in 1881. He was in private practice in Crawfordsville, Indiana from 1881 to 1902, and was a Prosecuting attorney of Montgomery County, Indiana from 1886 to 1890.

On December 8, 1902, Anderson was nominated by President Theodore Roosevelt to a seat on the United States District Court for the District of Indiana vacated by John H. Baker. Anderson was confirmed by the United States Senate on December 8, 1902, and received his commission the same day. He served on the District Court for just over 22 years, and on January 2, 1925, President Calvin Coolidge nominated him to a seat on the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit vacated by Francis Elisha Baker. Anderson was again confirmed by the United States Senate on January 6, 1925, receiving his commission the same day. He assumed senior status on October 30, 1929, serving thereafter until his death.

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