Stoney Trail

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Alberta Highway 201 shield

Highway 201
Stoney Trail
Route information
Maintained by Alberta Transportation
Length: 70 km (40 mi)
Planned: 99 km (62 mi)
Major junctions
Ring road around Calgary
North end: Hwy 1 (16 Avenue N) in Calgary northwest
  Hwy 1A
Hwy 772
Hwy 2
Hwy 564
Hwy 1
Hwy 1A
Hwy 560
Hwy 22X
Hwy 2
South end: Hwy 2A (Macleod Trail) in Calgary south
Location
Major cities: Calgary
Highway system

Provincial highways in Alberta

Hwy 100 Hwy 216

Stoney Trail, designated Alberta Provincial Highway No. 201 by Alberta Transportation,[1] is a ring road freeway around Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Currently located entirely within the City of Calgary, Stoney Trail is one of the two freeway ring roads in Alberta (the other being Anthony Henday Drive in Edmonton).

Stoney Trail serves as a bypass route for Alberta Highway 1, a major urban thoroughfare. It will also serve as a bypass route for Deerfoot Trail, Alberta's busiest freeway,[2] When the southeast leg was completed, its highway number, 201, was derived from these two highways.

Stoney Trail is split into four sections, designated by compass quadrants. The northeast segment was known as East Freeway until partway through construction. The construction of the southeast portion of the ring road started in the spring of 2010, and completed on November 22, 2013. The southwest segment was rejected in 2009 but was accepted by the Tsuu T'ina reserve in 2013 after another agreement.

Stoney Trail was named after the Nakoda First Nation, who are commonly known in English as the Stoney.

Contents

Transportation and utility corridor[edit]

Planning for the Calgary and Edmonton ring roads started in the 1970s when the province developed restricted development areas in a corridor of land then mostly outside the developed civic areas for future infrastructure including high-speed ring road systems.[3] This land is also known as the Transportation and Utility Corridor (TUC) as land set aside for future road and utility purposes. Land acquisition started in 1974 and by the time the ring road projects were initiated had acquired 97% of the lands. The Calgary TUC failed to include a TUC corridor in southwest Calgary between Glenmore Trail and Highway 22X.[4] The City of Calgary is bounded along 37 Street SW by the Tsuu T'ina Nation. The developed areas of the City of Calgary had already reached 37 Street SW around the Glenmore Reservoir inhibiting the ability of the government to impose an RDA. The missing link in the TUC map created uncertainty in the future Southwest Ring Road network which until October 2013 complicated completion of the Southwest Ring Road. However, in 2013 the Tsuu T'ina had another agreement with the province, which was accepted by the nation.

Stoney Trail Northwest[edit]

Stoney Trail at the interchange with Crowchild Trail

Stoney Trail consists of the western and northern part of the ring road, and, at its completion, will effectively be a freeway link between Highway 1 (Trans-Canada Highway) on the west side of Calgary and Deerfoot Trail (Highway 2). Although Highway 1 (as 16 Avenue N) does intersect Deerfoot Trail, travellers from the west must go through the city's urban area to do so.

The northwest quadrant of the ring road was the first to be constructed. In the mid-1990s, the province of Alberta built the first segment around the Bow River Bridge connecting Highway 1 with Crowchild Trail. This was subsequently extended to Country Hill Boulevard. In 2003, the province announced finishing the quadrant by extending the ring road 17 km north to link up with Deerfoot Trail. The original design was limited in scope and incorporated two interchanges, one flyover and two signallized intersections with completion scheduled in 2007 at a cost of $250 million. In January 2005, the province announced an increase in scope of the project with the addition of three additional interchanges replacing the existing lights at Crowchild Trail, Country Hills Boulevard and Scenic Acres.[5] Although the additional work was originally announced to fall within the original budget, subsequent news reports in 2006 reported the project budget had increased to $485 million.[6]

Bridge over Bow River

Along with increasing costs, the project was delayed and the full extension to Deerfoot Trail was not opened until November 2, 2009, although some sections were opened earlier.

The portion of the ring road between Harvest Hills Boulevard and Deerfoot Trail opened to traffic on November 2, 2009. 30,000 to 40,000 vehicles were expected to use this segment daily.[7] Actual peak traffic volumes exceeded 40,000 vpd between Crowchild Trail and Country Hills Boulevard in 2010.[8]

11 Street NE interchange[edit]

Rough grading has been completed for a future interchange at 11 Street NE.[9] This road would service undeveloped industrial land bounded to the east by Deerfoot Trail, north by Stoney Trail, west by the CPR right-of-way and south by Country Hills Boulevard. No schedule has been set for the construction of this interchange. The interchange will also provide a road connection north of Stoney Trail.

Harvest Hills Boulevard / Centre Street interchange[edit]

The northwest ring road opened on November 2, 2009, with signallized lights at Harvest Hills Boulevard but rough grading was completed for a future possible interchange. On November 25, 2009, the province announced construction of the Harvest Hills Boulevard Interchange to be opening in fall 2010.[10] The cost of the interchange project was $14 million.[11] The interchange opened to traffic in 2010.

14 Street NW interchange[edit]

Rough grading has been completed for a future interchange at 14 Street NW. At present, there is a right-in-right-out access south of Stoney Trail into the Panorama Hills neighbourhood.[9] No schedule has been set for the construction of this interchange. The interchange will also provide a road connection north of Stoney Trail. In summer 2014, grading for westbound exit to 14th (northbound only) and southbound 14th entrance ramp to westbound Stoney began.

Beddington Trail / Symons Valley Road interchange[edit]

Originally, this was going to be a signallized intersection when the project was initiated but was upgraded to an interchange when the project was finished in 2009. This interchange opened in July 2009 when the segment from Sarcee Trail to Harvest Hills Boulevard was opened a few months ahead of the full extension to Deerfoot Trail.[12]

Shaganappi Trail interchange[edit]

Originally, this was going to be a flyover with no connections to the northwest ring road when the project was initiated but was upgraded to an interchange when the project was finished in 2009. This interchange opened in July 2009 when the segment from Sarcee Trail to Harvest Hills Boulevard was opened a few months ahead of the full extension to Deerfoot Trail.[12]

Sarcee Trail interchange[edit]

This was going to be a signallized intersection when the northwest ring road project was initiated but was upgraded to an interchange when the project was completed. The segment from Country Hills Boulevard to Sarcee Trail was opened on November 25, 2008, a year ahead of the full extension to Deerfoot Trail.[13]

Country Hills Boulevard interchange[edit]

This interchange was added to the northwest ring road project in January 2005 to replace the original signallized intersection built when this segment of the ring road was built in the 1990s.[5] The original project scope had this remaining a signallized intersection. The interchange opened to traffic in September 2008.

Crowchild Trail interchange[edit]

A new interchange was announced on January 28, 2005, as part of an upgrade to the $250 million Calgary NW Ring Road Project .[5] The Crowchild Interchange was constructed along a pre-existing portion of Stoney Trail, at Crowchild Trail (Original completion Fall 2006). While building the Crowchild Interchange the City of Calgary made plans to extend the Northwest LRT to Tuscany in late 2007 which necessitated redesigning the Crowchild Interchange while still under construction.[14] The Crowchild interchange design was modified to include an LRT bridge to allow for the C-Train to be extended west to Tuscany station, and will be built as to not require signallized intersections for the ramps as was initially planned.[15] The Crowchild Interchange fully opened to traffic on September 28, 2011.[16]

Tuscany Boulevard / Scenic Acres Link interchange[edit]

This interchange was added to the northwest ring road project in January 2005 to replace the original signallized intersection built when this segment of the ring road was built in the 1990s.[5] This interchange necessitated the realignment and temporary closure of Scenic Acres Link.[17] The full interchange opened to traffic in the fall of 2009.

Nose Hill Drive interchange[edit]

Following the completion of the Crowchild Trail interchange, there will be traffic signals remaining only at the intersection of Nose Hill Drive. Aecom was retained in the spring of 2010 to plan, design and administer construction of this interchange to be open in the fall of 2012.[18] The interchange at Nose Hill Drive is expected to be completed in the fall of 2013.[19] Alberta Transportation announced on November 17, 2011, that the Nose Hill Drive interchange will be build by Acciona Infrastructure Canada at a cost of $67 million to be open to traffic in the fall of 2014.[20]

Southern extension of Stoney Trail[edit]

Planning for construction of the southern leg of Stoney Trail, which will link from the current southern terminus at Highway 1 to Highway 8 is currently in progress, although construction is not anticipated to start for several years.[21] This portion of the freeway will require additional bridge structures to be constructed on the 16 Avenue interchange, in addition to new overpasses and flyovers built at Old Banff Coach Road, Bow Trail (12 Avenue SW), 17 Avenue SW, and Glenmore Trail (Highway 8). The proposed alignment for this portion of the expressway will run south from its current terminus through the Paskapoo slopes on the west side of Canada Olympic Park, then adjacent to the communities of Cougar Ridge, West Springs, Aspen Woods, and Springbank Hill to the east of 101 Street SW, and ending with an interchange at Highway 8.[22][23]

Stoney Trail Northeast[edit]

The northeast portion of the Stoney Trail ring road, which was originally known as part of the East Freeway, opened to traffic on November 2, 2009, and links 17 Avenue SE (Highway 1A) to an interchange with Deerfoot Trail (Highway 2) on the northern side of Calgary.[24] The roadway runs in a nearly straight line approximately two-thirds of the way between 68 Street NE and 84 Street NE (city limits, Range Road 290) north from 17 Avenue SE, before turning west to the interchange with Deerfoot Trail.

In December 2005, the City of Calgary announced it was in talks with the province to fast-track construction of the East Freeway, which previously had been thought to be decades away from completion, so that it could be built within the next few years. On February 22, 2007, Alberta's Ministry of Infrastructure and Transportation awarded a contract to the Stoney Trail Group public-private partnership consortium (P3) to construct the first stage of the project, as well as to maintain the northwest and northeast sections of the ring road for 30 years following completion. This initial stage of construction began in 2007 and extends Stoney Trail by a length of 21 kilometres from Deerfoot Trail to 17 Avenue SE.[25]

Major interchanges along the northeast route include Métis Trail (which serves as an alternate link to the CrossIron Mills shopping area north of the city, Country Hills Boulevard, McKnight Boulevard, and 16 Avenue NE (Highway 1).

Métis Trail interchange[edit]

At the time of construction, a partial cloverleaf interchange was built for the connection to Métis Trail north to Highway 566 and a south road towards the City of Calgary.[26] The City of Calgary opened the extension of Métis Trail between 80 and 96 Avenues NE on October 29, 2011.[27]

60 Street NE interchange[edit]

At the time of construction, the earthworks was completed for a future interchange with 60 Street NE.[28] This interchange is to be completed by others in the future when required. At present, the adjacent city of Calgary land is undeveloped. The interchange could also contain a future northeast LRT extension over the ring road should the city decide to extend the northeast LRT north along 60 Street NE to the ring road.[26]

Country Hills Boulevard interchange[edit]

The NE Stoney Trail ring road includes an interchange at Country Hills Boulevard. It serves as a bypass to the Calgary International Airport instead of using Deerfoot Trail.

Airport Trail / 96 Avenue interchange[edit]

A limited-access interchange at Airport Trail / 96 Avenue NE was built at the time of northeast ring road construction but, as of December 2009, is not open to traffic as there was no connecting road. The existing Airport Trail / 96 Avenue interchange will provide direct access from the ring road to Calgary International Airport when Airport Trail is completed. As of October 12, 2011, 96 Avenue was opened from Stoney Trail west to 60 Street NE, accessible only from the south.[29]

McKnight Boulevard interchange[edit]

McKnight Boulevard currently has an diamond interchange with Stoney Trail. In the future, this will be upgraded into a partial cloverleaf interchange.

16 Avenue (Trans-Canada Highway) interchange[edit]

Stoney Trail intersects at 16 Avenue with a cloverleaf interchange. It is another way to get to major streets and destinations such as 36 Street and Sunridge Mall just west on 36 Street.

17 Avenue Southeast interchange[edit]

At the time of the northeast ring road construction, the 17 Avenue SE change was not included with the Northeast Ring Road P3 project. The current connection to 17 Avenue SE is a split-T at-grade signallized intersection. In reality, the Northeast Ring Road Project stopped a few hundred meters north of 17 Avenue where the median narrows for the intersection. The 17 Avenue interchange is to be constructed as part of the Southeast Ring Road Project.[30]

Stoney Trail Southeast / East Freeway[edit]

On March 2, 2009, the Alberta Government announced the proceeding with construction of the remaining portion of the East Freeway from 17 Avenue SE to Highway 22X (Marquis of Lorne Trail), as well as improvements to the existing Highway 22X roadway between that location and just east of the Macleod Trail (Highway 2A) interchange. This portion, like the northeastern portion, will be built as a P3.[31] Three firms bid on the contract: Chinook Partnership, SEConnect and SE Calgary Connector Group.[32] The winning bid for the project was submitted by Chinook Roads Partnership for 769 million dollars.[33] Chinook Roads Partnership will also be responsible for maintenance of this portion of the Ring Road, as well as maintenance of Deerfoot Trail (Highway 2) between Highway 22X and Highway 2A for 30 years after construction completion. Construction of this leg began in the spring of 2010 and was completed on November 22, 2013.

Initially the Stoney Trail name had not been expected to be used for the East Freeway; however, the name has been adopted in recent[when?] publications from Alberta Transportation. In the announcement for the southeast portion of the project, the East Freeway name was not referred to. The southeast leg of the Ring Road will be called Stoney Trail, as are the northwestern and northeastern sections.

The southeastern portion was opened on November 22, 2013, almost two months behind schedule. Construction began in the spring of 2010.[34]

Highway 22X / Marquis of Lorne Trail[edit]

There will be upgrades to Highway 22X or Marquis of Lorne Trail SE as part of the Southeast Calgary Ring Road Project.

Sun Valley Boulevard / Chaparral Boulevard interchange[edit]

The Sun Valley Boulevard / Chaparral Boulevard intersection will be upgraded to an interchange. The ultimate interchange plan calls for a partial cloverleaf design but the initial SECRR will use a diamond interchange design.[35] The original project schedule from June 2010 had interchange construction starting in 2010 with construction of the bridge structure in 2011 towards a phased opening in 2012-2013.[36] The revised project schedule of June 2011 had construction start in 2011 towards a 2013 interchange opening.

.[37] As of March 2012, field construction has begun on this interchange.

Looking southwest of Chaparral / Sun Valley Boulevard interchange, December 2011
Looking west of Sun Valley Boulevard / Chaparral interchange, February 2013

McKenzie Lake Boulevard / Cranston Boulevard interchange[edit]

The McKenzie Lake Boulevard / Cranston Boulevard intersection will also be upgraded to a modified diamond interchange; work on this interchange got underway in 2010 and by fall 2011 the bridge structure had already been erected.[38] The interchange design is a modified diamond as this interchange is proximal to the full systems interchange upgrade for the 22X / Deerfoot Trail Interchange.

Looking east of Cranston / Lake McKenzie Boulevard interchange, December 2011

The original project schedule from June 2010 had this interchange opening in the fall of 2011.[36] The revised project schedule of June 2011 still indicated a fall 2011 opening but work will continue on this intersection into 2012.[37][dated info] Of note is the construction detours; once this interchange opens, access to eastbound Highway 22X will be temporarily closed until the Deerfoot Trail Interchange upgrade is complete in 2013.[dated info]

Looking east at Cranston (Lake McKenzie) interchange, February 2013

The interchange design also brings complaints to some commuters and Cranston residents due to the interchange having no access from westbound Stoney Trail to the interchange or the Cranston Avenue / Seton Boulevard interchange on Deerfoot Trail. Commuters also cannot go on to the ramp to Deerfoot Trail southbound and can go only northbound when on the ramp to the highway. The commuters are forced to use the 52 Street interchange to the east. As for the commuters heading to northbound Deerfoot, they have to head to the McKenzie Towne / McKenzie Lake Boulevard interchange or the Seton Boulevard / Cranston Avenue interchange, which both lead to Deerfoot Trail northbound.

Deerfoot Trail interchange[edit]

The Deerfoot Trail interchange will have intertwined access ramps with the Mackenzie / Cranston interchange to the west.[39] Eastbound 22X to northbound Deerfoot Trail will have a multi-stack flyover as will westbound 22X to southbound Deerfoot Trail. No access ramps will have signallized intersections on the Deerfoot interchange. This interchange will be constructed in three phases before being finally completed in the fall of 2013 with the Southeast Calgary Ring Road Project.[dated info]

Phase 1 construction involves relocating the existing westbound 22X to northbound Deerfoot and eastbound 22X to southbound Deerfoot access ramps which will open to traffic in Phase 2. Perhaps the biggest construction detour disruption of the project is the construction of a new temporary eastbound 22X to northbound Deerfoot traffic signallized intersection and access ramp. Opening to traffic in Phase 2, the existing cloverleaf access ramp will be closed. This will add an additional set of lights on 22X on the east side of the existing interchange. This closure is necessary to construct the main line Deerfoot Trail southbound to 22X eastbound flyover ramps where the existing cloverleaf ramp exists.

Phase 2 construction involves further realignment of access ramps including the southbound Deerfoot to westbound 22X ramp including tie in to the new Cranston / Lake Mackenzie Boulevard interchange and related access ramps. Construction of the Deerfoot/22X mainline flyover will also be undertaken.

Phase 3 construction completes the revised interchange design with construction of the eastbound 22X to northbound Deerfoot flyover ramp with structures over 22X and Deerfoot Trail as well as completing the new southbound Deerfoot to eastbound 22X cloverleaf ramp connection.

Photograph looking east on 22X at flyover structure from east bound 22X to north bound Deerfoot Trail as of February 2013
Photograph looking east of Calgary Southeast Ring Road main line flyover structures between 22X and Highway 2 as of February 2013

Deerfoot Trail to East Freeway[edit]

This section of Highway 22 will be twinned, an upgrade from the current single-lane undivided roadway. Current construction schedules have this twinning of the main line ring road being built from spring 2011 to spring 2012.[37][dated info] As of December 2011, rough grading work of the twinned sections is underway with some primary layers of asphalt overlay but no sections are yet open to traffic.

52 Street SE interchange[edit]

The 52nd Street SE intersection will be upgraded to a partial cloverleaf interchange.[40] The original project schedule from June 2010 had this interchange fully opening in the fall of 2013 with traffic on the new structure in the summer of 2012 with construction starting in 2011.[36] The revised project schedule of June 2011 still indicated a fall 2013 opening, the only significant difference is the temporary constructions detour road has been shifted to the east side of the bridge structure from the west side.[37] As of December 2011, construction of the interchange had started with rough grading of the interchange ramps and piling installation. 52 Street interchange was completed with the rest of the project on November 22, 2013.

Looking west of 52 Street SE interchange, December 2011
Looking west at 52 Street interchange, February 2013

East Freeway / 88 Street SE / Highway 22X interchange[edit]

At 88 Street SE, the East Freeway segment will intersect 22X with a full systems interchange now under construction. The existing intersection with 88 Street SE will be removed as it is too close to the proposed interchange.[41] Current documents have 88 Street SE north of 22X closing no earlier than March 31, 2012.[dated info] This road is the defacto southeast ring road used by motorists until the southeast ring road opens to traffic in the fall of 2013.[dated info] Closure of 88 Street north of 22X will cause construction detour disruption for motorists in the area.

Looking west 88 Street SE interchange, December 2011
Looking west at 88 Street interchange, February 2013

East Freeway / 22X to Glenmore[edit]

Heading north on the new East Freeway alignment which is a few hundred meters west of the existing 88 Street SE, at the junction of Highway 22X, the scope of the interchange infringes on the existing 88 Street roadway, necessitating its closure. .

Looking north at junction of Highway 22X and 88 Street SE, December 2011. Existing 88 Street on right, future interchange ramp on left.

130 Avenue SE interchange[edit]

The new southeast ring road will intersect 130 Avenue with a diamond interchange. This will also be completed on a later date in the future.[42]

114 Avenue SE interchange[edit]

There will be a similar partial cloverleaf interchange at the intersection of 114 Avenue SE. During construction, 114 Avenue was also re-aligned. The interchange fully opened on November 22, 2013. This interchange is critical for all the trucks and factories near the interchange.[43]

106 Avenue flyover[edit]

In the plans are a future flyover of 106 Avenue, but this will not be part of the original Southeast Ring Road Project. It is to be constructed by others at a future date. It will have no connecting roads with the Southeast Ring Road.

Glenmore Trail interchange[edit]

Heading north, the ring road will intersect existing Glenmore Trail with a full clover stack systems interchange.[44] East- and westbound Glenmore Trail will both have left-turn flyover ramps, whereas this turning movement on the ring road will have cloverleaf ramps. It will be a full systems interchange with no signal lights.

Looking south at Glenmore Trail overpass structure, February 2013

Glenmore to 17 Avenue SE[edit]

Peigan Trail interchange[edit]

The Southeast Ring Road will have a partial cloverleaf interchange with Peigan Trail. Peigan Trail will also be extended from 52 Street to Stoney Trail as a result.

17 Avenue SE interchange[edit]

The Southeast Ring Road will directly connect to the existing Northeast Ring Road at 17 Avenue SE will be upgraded to a partial cloverleaf interchange.[45]

Looking south of 17th Avenue interchange, February 2013

61 Avenue flyover[edit]

Similar to 106 Avenue, there are provisions for a future flyover of 61 Avenue to be built by others at a future date. There is no connections to the ring road.

Macleod Trail interchange[edit]

In the fall of 2011, the province held a community consultation meeting on upgrading the Macleod Trail / 22X interchange, which was not included in the southeast ring road project. Pending funding, this will open in the fall of 2014 which includes twinning the bridge over Macleod Trail and twinning an additional bridge structure over the CPR right-of-way. The existing interchange is also only an undivided single lane in each direction along 22X on the bridge structure over Macleod Trail. This is the only single-lane segment of 22X between Deerfoot Trail and the junction with Highway 22 15 km west of Calgary.

This will upgrade the interchange to a full cloverleaf and remove the lights on 22X west of Macleod Trail. This will become an interim full systems interchange with no signallized intersections on the access ramps. The ultimate interchange design includes a stacked interchange with flyovers from westbound 22X to southbound Macleod Trail and northbound Macleod to westbound 22X.[46] The ultimate interchange design was predicated on the traffic volumes associated with the Southwest Calgary Ring Road and was to have been built as part of the Southwest Calgary Ring Road project. With the Tsuu T'ina vote of June 30, 2009 rejecting the ring road agreement putting uncertainty back in the Southwest Ring Road project, the construction of the ultimate interchange configuration has been deferred.

This interchange is further complicated by the fact it contains a right in right out access into the adjacent Shawnessy Town Center regional commercial area. At present, traffic can exit onto the interchange access ramps allowing egress to eastbound and westbound Highway 22X. Reduced access from the Shawnessy Town Center will be maintained but only onto the southbound Macleod to westbound 22X ramp.[47]

Southwest Calgary Ring Road[edit]

The final leg of the Calgary Ring Road, currently known as the Southwest Calgary Ring Road, but also widely referred to as the Sarcee Trail Extension, is still in the initial planning and public consultation stages. The original proposed route ran from approximately the intersection of Sarcee Trail and Glenmore Trail (Highway 8), south through the Tsuu T'ina First Nation to eventually reach Spruce Meadows Trail in the south of the city. Plans called for the road to be initially built as a 4-6 lane expressway with the ability to easily upgrade the corridor to the 'ultimate' stage (to be completed by 2035) as a 16 lane freeway with express and collector lanes. However, the routing was rejected by the Tsuu T'ina First Nation on June 30, 2009. Despite indications from the band that they would like to reopen negotiations, the province has shown little interest. As an alternative, the City of Calgary proposed constructing an interchange at the intersection of Glenmore Trail and 37 Street SW. Construction of phase one of the interchange began in May 2010[48] and opened to traffic in September 2010.[49] In 2013, the province announced that they will have another negotiation. This time however, the negotiation has passed after several decades of rejections. They will also go with the initial plans of the 2009 ring roads designs.

Highway 22X/Spruce Meadows Trail[edit]

Planned upgrades for the Highway 22X or Spruce Meadows Trail SW portion of the Southwest Calgary Ring Road include upgrading Highway 22X west of Macleod Trail to freeway status. These three interchange upgrades along with the Highway 22X / Macleod Trail Interchange upgrades were part of the Southwest Calgary Ring Road project which was to be completed with the successful agreement with the Tsuu T'ina Nation on the contentious Anderson Road to Glenmore Trail segment. With the acceptance of the agreement on October 24, 2013, the 22X interchange upgrades will be constructed with the rest of the Southwest Ring Road Project.

6 Street SW interchange[edit]

Highway 22X/Southwest Calgary Ring Road will retain connectivity with 6 Street SW which will be upgraded to partial cloverleaf interchanges. The close proximity of 6 Street SW to Macleod Trail will necessitate some shared access ramps.[47]

James McKevitt Road interchange[edit]

Highway 22X/Southwest Calgary Ring Road will also retain connectivity with James McKevitt Road upgrading to a partial cloverleaf interchange.[47]

24 Street SW intersection[edit]

The existing intersection of 24 Street with 22X will be removed when the Southwest Calgary Ring Road is constructed as this road is just east of the future junction of 22X and the future north-south alignment of the Southwest Calgary Ring Road.[50]

Highway 22X and Southwest Calgary Ring Road/Sarcee Trail Extension interchange[edit]

A new full systems interchange built at 22X and the new alignment for the northwest-southeast segment of the Southwest Ring Road (Sarcee Trail Extension) to Anderson Road.[50]

37 Street SW intersection[edit]

The existing intersection and 37 Street would be removed when the Southwest Calgary Ring Road is constructed as this road is just west of the future junction of 22X and the future north-south alignment of the Southwest Calgary Ring Road (Sarcee Trail Extension).[50]

162 Avenue interchange[edit]

At present 162 Avenue does not connect with either the future Southwest Ring Road ROW or 37 Street SW. When the Southwest Ring Road is built, 162 Avenue will be extended west to connect up with the Ring Road. The future interchange will be a partial cloverleaf.[51]

Fish Creek Boulevard interchange[edit]

The existing at grade intersection with 37 Street SW will be replaced with a service interchange. The existing 37 Street roadway from Fish Creek Boulevard north to Anderson road will become part of the Southwest Ring Road.

130 Avenue SW interchange[edit]

The existing at grade signallized intersection will be replaced with a service interchange. At the existing intersection, there is a provision for a future road connection to the west heading onto the Tsuu T'ina Nation. It is believed this possible access will be retained in the future interchange design. At present, the land west of 37 Street SW at 130 Avenue is part of the Buffalo Run Golf Course run by the Tsuu T'ina Nation.

Anderson Road interchange[edit]

The existing signallized interchange of 37 Street SW and Anderson Road will be replaced with a full systems stacked interchange allowing all freeflow turning accesses from both Anderson Road and the Southwest Ring Road. Full connection with the Tsuu T'ina Nation will be continued at Anderson Road as this access is protected by Treaty.

West Calgary Ring Road[edit]

There is an existing TUC ROW heading south from Highway 1 for the southern extension of Stoney Trail to Highway 8. This road goes on the west side of Canada Olympic Park and east of the existing 101 Street SE road. This section of the ring road proceeds on a different alignment that the segment south of Glenmore Trail. Highway 8 east to Glenmore Trail is also planned to be upgraded to freeway status as part of the Southwest Ring Road development.

Highway 1 to Bow Trail[edit]

Stoney Trail will have a partial cloverleaf interchange connections with Old Banff Coach Road and Bow Trail.[52]

Bow Trail to Highway 8[edit]

Stoney Trail continues south with a partial diamond interchange connection with 17th Avenue SW connecting up with a partial split T stacked systems interchange with Highway 8.[53] There will be no signal lights on any of the turning ramps at this intersection.

Interchanges and intersections[edit]

All proposed exits reflect current planning.

Southwest Calgary Ring Road[edit]

This table is not an attempt to predict the agreement between the Province and the Tsuu T'ina First Nation; rather, it is a list of the roads that Highway 201 would cross, and approximate coordinates.

Direction Exit km Intersecting road Current intersection type Planned interchange Interchange open date Coordinates
East-West 5 6 Alberta Highway 2A.svg Macleod Trail (Highway 2A) Partial Cloverleaf Full Systems Interchange 2014? 50°53′33″N 114°4′43″W / 50.89250°N 114.07861°W / 50.89250; -114.07861 (201 km 06)
7 6 Street SW / Sheriff King Street (Range Road 14) At-grade (traffic lights) Partial Cloverleaf TBD 50°53′33″N 114°4′21″W / 50.89250°N 114.07250°W / 50.89250; -114.07250 (201 km 06.9)
8 James Mckevitt Road / Spruce Meadows Way (Range Road 15) Split intersection Partial Cloverleaf TBD 50°53′35″N 114°5′38″W / 50.89306°N 114.09389°W / 50.89306; -114.09389 (201 km 08)
9 Tournament Lane (19 Street SW, Range Road 15A) Split intersection Removed TBD 50°53′36″N 114°6′19″W / 50.89333°N 114.10528°W / 50.89333; -114.10528 (201 km 09)
10 24 Street SW (Range Road 20) Split intersection Removed TBD 50°53′37″N 114°7′2″W / 50.89361°N 114.11722°W / 50.89361; -114.11722 (201 km 10)
Southeast-Northwest 12 162 Avenue SW none Partial Cloverleaf TBD 50°54′23″N 114°7′35″W / 50.90639°N 114.12639°W / 50.90639; -114.12639 (201 km 12)
13 Fish Creek Boulevard At-grade Partial Cloverleaf TBD 50°55′15″N 114°7′55″W / 50.92083°N 114.13194°W / 50.92083; -114.13194 (201 km 13)
South-North 15 130 Avenue SW At-grade (traffic lights) Diamond TBD 50°56′9″N 114°8′24″W / 50.93583°N 114.14000°W / 50.93583; -114.14000 (201 km 15)
17 Anderson Road / Bull Head Road At-grade (traffic lights) Full Systems Cloverstack TBD 50°57′1″N 114°8′21″W / 50.95028°N 114.13917°W / 50.95028; -114.13917 (201 km 17)
24 Alberta Highway 8.svg Sarcee Trail / Glenmore Trail (Highway 8) At-grade (traffic lights) Split T Partial Stacked Systems TBD 51°0′32″N 114°9′49″W / 51.00889°N 114.16361°W / 51.00889; -114.16361 (201 km 24)

Stoney Trail West[edit]

Direction Exit km Intersecting road Current intersection type Planned interchange Interchange open date Coordinates
East-West 24 Alberta Highway 8.svg Sarcee Trail / Glenmore Trail (Highway 8) At-grade (traffic lights) Split T Partial Stacked Systems TBD 51°0′32″N 114°9′49″W / 51.00889°N 114.16361°W / 51.00889; -114.16361 (201 km 24)
26 69 Street SW / Discovery Ridge Boulevard At-grade (traffic lights) Service Interchange TBD 51°0′51″N 114°11′43″W / 51.01417°N 114.19528°W / 51.01417; -114.19528 (201 km 26)
South-North 27 Hwy 8 (Glenmore Trail) At-grade Split T Partial Stacked Systems TBD 51°1′21″N 114°13′32″W / 51.02250°N 114.22556°W / 51.02250; -114.22556 (201 km 27)
28 Lower Springbank Road none unknown TBD 51°1′38″N 114°13′53″W / 51.02722°N 114.23139°W / 51.02722; -114.23139 (201 km 28)
30 17 Avenue SW / Township Road 242 none Partial Cloverleaf TBD 51°2′16″N 114°13′56″W / 51.03778°N 114.23222°W / 51.03778; -114.23222 (201 km 30)
32 Bow Trail (12 Avenue SW) none Partial Cloverleaf TBD 51°3′7″N 114°13′39″W / 51.05194°N 114.22750°W / 51.05194; -114.22750 (201 km 32)
34 Hwy 563 (Old Banff Coach Road) none Partial Cloverleaf TBD 51°4′1″N 114°13′40″W / 51.06694°N 114.22778°W / 51.06694; -114.22778 (201 km 34)
36 36 Hwy 1 (Trans-Canada Highway) T-bone interchange Stack interchange TBD 51°5′19″N 114°13′55″W / 51.08861°N 114.23194°W / 51.08861; -114.23194 (201 km 36)

Stoney Trail Northwest[edit]

Kilometres 54 to 80 opened November 2, 2009.

Direction Exit km Intersecting road Current intersection type Planned interchange Interchange open date Coordinates
South-North 36 36 Hwy 1 (Trans-Canada Highway) T-bone interchange Stack interchange 2007 51°5′19″N 114°13′55″W / 51.08861°N 114.23194°W / 51.08861; -114.23194 (201 km 36)
38 Scenic Bow Road & Bearspaw Dam Road Overpass 1990's 51°6′9″N 114°13′40″W / 51.10250°N 114.22778°W / 51.10250; -114.22778 (201 km 37.8)
38 38 Nose Hill Drive At-grade (traffic lights) Partial cloverleaf interchange Fall 2014 51°6′22″N 114°13′28″W / 51.10611°N 114.22444°W / 51.10611; -114.22444 (201 km 38)
39 40 Scenic Acres Link / Tuscany Boulevard Folded diamond interchange Fall 2008 51°7′6″N 114°13′50″W / 51.11833°N 114.23056°W / 51.11833; -114.23056 (201 km 40)
Southwest-Northeast 41 41 Hwy 1A (Crowchild Trail) At-grade (traffic lights) Cloverstack November 2011 51°7′52″N 114°13′40″W / 51.13111°N 114.22778°W / 51.13111; -114.22778 (201 km 41)
43 43 Country Hills Boulevard Partial cloverleaf interchange September 2008 51°8′41″N 114°12′12″W / 51.14472°N 114.20333°W / 51.14472; -114.20333 (201 km 43)
West-East 46 46 Sarcee Trail Diamond interchange November 2008 51°9′7″N 114°9′56″W / 51.15194°N 114.16556°W / 51.15194; -114.16556 (201 km 46)
48 48 Shaganappi Trail Partial cloverleaf interchange July 2009 51°9′10″N 114°8′26″W / 51.15278°N 114.14056°W / 51.15278; -114.14056 (201 km 48)
Southwest-Northeast 50 50 Beddington Trail / Hwy 772 (Symons Valley Road) Partial cloverleaf interchange November 2009 51°9′24″N 114°6′58″W / 51.15667°N 114.11611°W / 51.15667; -114.11611 (201 km 50)
West-East 52 52 14 Street NW (Range Road 14) At-grade (eastbound on and off ramps only) Partial cloverleaf interchange TBD 51°10′26″N 114°5′33″W / 51.17389°N 114.09250°W / 51.17389; -114.09250 (201 km 52)
54 54 Harvest Hills Boulevard / Centre Street N (Range Road 13) Partial cloverleaf interchange November 2009 51°10′25″N 114°4′8″W / 51.17361°N 114.06889°W / 51.17361; -114.06889 (201 km 54)
56 11 Street NE (Range Road 12) none Partial cloverleaf interchange TBD 51°10′32″N 114°2′11″W / 51.17556°N 114.03639°W / 51.17556; -114.03639 (201 km 56)
58 15 Street NE (Range Road 11) Overpass TBD 51°10′34″N 114°1′15″W / 51.17611°N 114.02083°W / 51.17611; -114.02083 (201 km 58)
60-A 59 Alberta Highway 2.svg Deerfoot Trail (Highway 2) southbound Cloverstack November 2009 51°10′33″N 114°0′3″W / 51.17583°N 114.00083°W / 51.17583; -114.00083 (201 km 59)
60-B Alberta Highway 2.svg Highway 2 northbound

Stoney Trail Northeast[edit]

Opened November 2, 2009.

Direction Exit km Intersecting road Current intersection type Planned interchange Interchange open date Coordinates
West-East 60-A 59 Alberta Highway 2.svg Deerfoot Trail (Highway 2) southbound Cloverstack November 2, 2009 51°10′33″N 114°0′3″W / 51.17583°N 114.00083°W / 51.17583; -114.00083 (201 km 59)
60-B Alberta Highway 2.svg Highway 2 northbound
62 61 Métis Trail Partial cloverleaf interchange November 2, 2009 51°10′32″N 113°58′10″W / 51.17556°N 113.96944°W / 51.17556; -113.96944 (201 km 61)
63 60 Street NE Rough Grading, no road Diamond interchange TBD 51°10′32″N 113°56′40″W / 51.17556°N 113.94444°W / 51.17556; -113.94444 (201 km 63)
North-South 68 67
564
AB-secondary highway.svg
Country Hills Boulevard (Highway 564)
Partial cloverleaf interchange November 2, 2009 51°9′16″N 113°55′16″W / 51.15444°N 113.92111°W / 51.15444; -113.92111 (201 km 67)
70 69 Airport Trail/96 Avenue NE Partially Open to southbound traffic Partial cloverleaf interchange October 12, 2011 51°8′11″N 113°55′17″W / 51.13639°N 113.92139°W / 51.13639; -113.92139 (201 km 69)
74 74 McKnight Boulevard / Township Road 250 Diamond Interchange Partial cloverleaf interchange November 2, 2009 51°5′48″N 113°55′7″W / 51.09667°N 113.91861°W / 51.09667; -113.91861 (201 km 74)
78 77 Alberta Highway 1.svg 16 Avenue NE (Highway 1), Trans-Canada Highway) Cloverstack November 2, 2009 51°4′1″N 113°55′14″W / 51.06694°N 113.92056°W / 51.06694; -113.92056 (201 km 77)
81 80 Alberta Highway 1A.svg 17 Avenue SE (Highway 1A) Partial Cloverleaf Interchange November 22, 2013 51°2′16″N 113°55′16″W / 51.03778°N 113.92111°W / 51.03778; -113.92111 (201 km 80)

Stoney Trail Southeast/East Freeway[edit]

Construction completed and opened November 22, 2013. The 130 Avenue interchange is not yet built and has currently only Rough Grading.

Direction Exit km Intersecting road Current intersection type Planned interchange Interchange open date Coordinates
North-South 81 80 Alberta Highway 1A.svg 17 Avenue SE (Highway 1A) Partial Cloverleaf Interchange November 22, 2013 51°2′16″N 113°55′16″W / 51.03778°N 113.92111°W / 51.03778; -113.92111 (201 km 80)
84 83 Peigan Trail Partial Cloverleaf Interchange November 22, 2013 51°0′49″N 113°55′18″W / 51.01361°N 113.92167°W / 51.01361; -113.92167 (201 km 83)
88 87
560
AB-secondary highway.svg
Glenmore Trail (Highway 560)
Partial Cloverleaf Interchange November 22, 2013 50°58′47″N 113°55′18″W / 50.97972°N 113.92167°W / 50.97972; -113.92167 (201 km 87)
91 90 114 Avenue SE (Township Road 232) Partial Cloverleaf Interchange November 22, 2013 50°57′2″N 113°55′18″W / 50.95056°N 113.92167°W / 50.95056; -113.92167 (201 km 90)
92 130 Avenue SE (Township Road 230) Rough Grading, no road Diamond Interchange TBD 50°55′43″N 113°55′13″W / 50.92861°N 113.92028°W / 50.92861; -113.92028 (201 km 92)
East-West 96 96 Alberta Highway 22X.svg Marquis of Lorne Trail (Highway 22X) Cloverstack Full Systems Interchange November 22, 2013 50°54′24″N 113°55′56″W / 50.90667°N 113.93222°W / 50.90667; -113.93222 (201 km 96)

As Highway 22X[edit]

Presently named Highway 22X, this existing stretch would complete the ring once the southwest leg has been constructed, it will have freeway status once improvements have been completed. Both the SE and Southwest Ring Road Projects include Highway 22X upgrades. With the SE Ring Road, the 52 Street SE, Deerfoot Trail, Lake Mackenzie/Cranston Boulevard and Sun Valley/Chaparral Boulevard interchanges will be completed. The Southwest Ring Road project will include the 6 Street SW and James Mckevitt interchanges as well as the Macleod Trail overpass upgrade to a system interchange.

Direction Exit km Intersecting road Current intersection type Planned interchange Interchange open date Coordinates
North-south 96 96 SE Ring Road (East Freeway) Cloverstack Full Systems Interchange November 22, 2013 50°54′24″N 113°55′56″W / 50.90667°N 113.93222°W / 50.90667; -113.93222 (201 km 96)
East-West 99 97 52 Street SE Partial Cloverleaf Interchange November 22, 2013 50°54′18″N 113°56′48″W / 50.90500°N 113.94667°W / 50.90500; -113.94667 (201 km 97)
101B 99
0
Alberta Highway 2.svg Deerfoot Trail (Highway 2) northbound Cloverstack Full Systems Interchange November 22, 2013 50°54′0″N 113°58′31″W / 50.90000°N 113.97528°W / 50.90000; -113.97528 (201 km 00)
101A Alberta Highway 2.svg Highway 2 southbound
1 1 McKenzie Lake Boulevard / Cranston Boulevard Diamond Interchange November 22, 2013 50°53′50″N 113°59′31″W / 50.89722°N 113.99194°W / 50.89722; -113.99194 (201 km 01)
2 Bow Bottom Trail Overpass No Change Existing 50°53′38″N 114°0′39″W / 50.89389°N 114.01083°W / 50.89389; -114.01083 (201 km 02)
3 4 Sun Valley Boulevard / Chaparral Boulevard Diamond Interchange Partial Cloverleaf Interchange November 22, 2013 50°53′34″N 114°1′33″W / 50.89278°N 114.02583°W / 50.89278; -114.02583 (201 km 04)
5 6 Alberta Highway 2A.svg Macleod Trail (Highway 2A) Partial cloverleaf interchange Cloverleaf Interchange Fall 2014? 50°53′33″N 114°3′16″W / 50.89250°N 114.05444°W / 50.89250; -114.05444 (201 km 06)
7 6 Street SW / Sheriff King Street (Range Road 14) At-grade (traffic lights) Partial Cloverleaf TBD 50°53′33″N 114°4′21″W / 50.89250°N 114.07250°W / 50.89250; -114.07250 (201 km 06.9)
8 James Mckevitt Road / Spruce Meadows Way (Range Road 15) Split intersection Partial Cloverleaf TBD 50°53′35″N 114°5′38″W / 50.89306°N 114.09389°W / 50.89306; -114.09389 (201 km 08)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Provincial Highways Designation Order, Alberta Transportation, p. 10 
  2. ^ Alberta Transportation (2010-11-03). "Deerfoot Trail construction wraps up busy year". Retrieved 2010-12-19. 
  3. ^ Government of Alberta (2009-11-02). "Transportation and Utilities Corridor - Introduction". Retrieved December 11, 2011. 
  4. ^ Government of Alberta (2009-11-02). "Transportation and Utilities Corridor - Calgary TUC Map". Retrieved December 11, 2011. 
  5. ^ a b c d Alberta Transportation (2005). "Innovative Planning means new Interchanges to Stoney Trail". Retrieved November 27, 2010. 
  6. ^ DCN News (2006). "Costs for Ring Road Around Calgary Soar". Retrieved December 10, 2011. </
  7. ^ CBC News (2009-11-02). "Northern leg of Calgary ring road opens". Retrieved November 2, 2009. 
  8. ^ Alberta Transportation (2010). "Alberta Highways 1 to 986 - Traffic Volume Statistic Report 2010". Retrieved November 27, 2010. 
  9. ^ a b Alberta Transportation (2010). "Stoney Trail Corridor - Trans Canada Highway to Deerfoot Trail". Retrieved December 5, 2011. 
  10. ^ Alberta Transportation News Release (2009). "Lights go out at Harvest Hills Boulevard in Calgary". Retrieved December 5, 2011. 
  11. ^ Alberta Transportation News Release (2010). "Road Work rolls out in Calgary and Area". Retrieved December 5, 2011. 
  12. ^ a b Alberta Transportation News Release (2009). "Portion of Stoney Trail NW Opens in Calgary". Retrieved December 10, 2011. 
  13. ^ Alberta Transportation News Release (2008). "Portion of Stoney Trail NW Opens in Calgary". Retrieved December 10, 2011. 
  14. ^ Alberta Transportation (2008). "Stoney Trail/Crowchild Trail Interchange Spring 2008 Project Update". Retrieved November 27, 2010. 
  15. ^ Alberta Transportation (2010). "Stoney Trail / Crowchild Trail Interchange". Retrieved November 27, 2010. 
  16. ^ Alberta Transportation Travellors Advisory (2011). "Signal lights removed from Stoney Trail-Crowchild Trail interchange in Calgary". Retrieved November 17, 2011. 
  17. ^ Alberta Transportation News Release (2008). "Scenic Acres Link NW Re-opens to traffic". Retrieved December 10, 2011. 
  18. ^ Alberta Transportation Project Update (2010). "Stoney Trail/Nose Hill Drive Interchange Spring 2010 Project Update". Retrieved November 23, 2011. 
  19. ^ Alberta Transportation (2010). "Stoney Trail / Nose Hill Drive Interchange". Retrieved November 27, 2010. 
  20. ^ Alberta Transportation News Release (2011). "Interchange Replaces last set of lights on Calgary Ring Road". Retrieved November 17, 2011. 
  21. ^ Alberta Transportation (2008). "Stoney Trail Extension - Highway 8 to Highway 1". Retrieved December 15, 2008. 
  22. ^ Alberta Transportation (2008). "Trans Canada Highway to Bow Trail" (PDF). Retrieved December 15, 2008. 
  23. ^ Alberta Transportation (2008). "Bow Trail SE to Highway 8" (PDF). Retrieved December 15, 2008. 
  24. ^ Alberta Transportation: Stony Trail Extension Northeast Freeway
  25. ^ Alberta Transportation (2007). "Northeast Calgary ring road construction starts in spring". 
  26. ^ a b Alberta Transportation. "Northeast Stoney Trail - 60 Street NE to Deerfoot Trail". Retrieved November 28, 2011. 
  27. ^ City of Calgary (2011). "Métis Trail Extension 80 Avenue NE to 96 Avenue NE". Retrieved November 25, 2011. 
  28. ^ Alberta Transportation. "Northeast Stoney Trail - 60 Street NE to Deerfoot Trail". Retrieved November 28, 2011. 
  29. ^ City of Calgary (2011). "96 Avenue NE 60 St NE. to Stoney Trail". Retrieved November 28, 2011. 
  30. ^ Alberta Transportation (2011). "Northeast Stoney Trail 17 Avenue NE to 32 Avenue SE". Retrieved November 30, 2011. 
  31. ^ Alberta Transportation (2009). "Southeast Calgary ring road drives out of the starting blocks". Retrieved March 21, 2009. 
  32. ^ Alberta Transportation (2009). "Three Firms to bid for Southeast Calgary Ring Road". Retrieved November 22, 2011. 
  33. ^ Alberta Transportation (2010). "Stoney Trail in Calgary Drives Forward". Retrieved November 22, 2011. 
  34. ^ City of Calgary (2007). "City of Calgary: Mahogany Community Plan June 2007" (PDF). Retrieved January 27, 2008. 
  35. ^ Government of Alberta (2008). "Government of Alberta: 6th St SW to Deerfoot Trail SE - Recommended Stage 1 Roadway Alignments and Interchange Configuration" (PDF). Retrieved November 10, 2011. 
  36. ^ a b c Chinook Roads Partnership/Government of Alberta Infrastructure and Transportation (2010). "Chinook Roads Partnership: Mackenzie Lake Boulevard/Cranston Boulevard SE". Retrieved December 17, 2011. 
  37. ^ a b c d Chinook Roads Partnership/Government of Alberta Infrastructure and Transportation (2011). "Chinook Roads Partnership: Mackenzie Lake Boulevard/Cranston Boulevard SE". Retrieved December 17, 2011. 
  38. ^ Government of Alberta Infrastructure and Transportation (2006). "Government of Alberta: Marquis of Lorne Trail between Mackenzie Lake Boulevard to Deerfoot Trail SE" (PDF). Retrieved November 10, 2011. 
  39. ^ Government of Alberta Infrastructure and Transportation (2006). "Government of Alberta: Marquis of Lorne Trail between Mackenzie Lake Boulevard to Deerfoot Trail SE." (PDF). Retrieved November 10, 2011. 
  40. ^ Government of Alberta Infrastructure and Transportation (2006). "Government of Alberta: Calgary East Ring Road between Marquis of Lorne Trail and 52nd St. SE.". Retrieved November 10, 2011. 
  41. ^ Government of Alberta Infrastructure and Transportation (2006). "Government of Alberta: Calgary East Ring Road between 52 Street SE and 88 Street SE". Retrieved November 16, 2011. 
  42. ^ Government of Alberta Infrastructure and Transportation (2006). "Government of Alberta: Calgary East Ring Road between 130 Avenue SE and Marquis of Lorne Trail". Retrieved November 16, 2011. 
  43. ^ Government of Alberta Infrastructure and Transportation (2006). "Government of Alberta: Calgary East Ring Road between 106 Avenue SE and 130 Avenue SE". Retrieved November 16, 2011. 
  44. ^ Government of Alberta Infrastructure and Transportation (2006). "Government of Alberta: Calgary East Ring Road between 61 Avenue SE and 130 Avenue SE". Retrieved November 16, 2011. 
  45. ^ Government of Alberta Infrastructure and Transportation (2006). "Government of Alberta: Calgary East Ring Road between Peigan Trail SE and Memorial Drive SE". Retrieved November 16, 2011. 
  46. ^ Government of Alberta (2009). "Government of Alberta: Southwest Calgary Ring Road to Macleod Trail Interchange Plan - Recommended Stage 1 Roadway Alignment and Interchange Configuration" (PDF). Retrieved December 18, 2011. 
  47. ^ a b c Government of Alberta (2011). "Government of Alberta: Stoney Trail (Highway 22X) and Macleod Trail Interchange Plan" (PDF). Retrieved November 10, 2011. 
  48. ^ "Glenmore Trail SW & 37 Street SW – Phase One: Construction Begins". City of Calgary. 2010-04-30. Retrieved 2011-02-18. 
  49. ^ "Glenmore Trail / 37 Street SW Interchange". City of Calgary. 2010-11-12. Retrieved 2011-02-18. 
  50. ^ a b c "Southwest Calgary Ring Road to Macleod Trail - Recommended Stage 1 Roadway Alignment and Interchange Configuration to 2035 Time Horizon". Government of Alberta. May 2009. Retrieved 2011-11-14. 
  51. ^ "Southwest Calgary Ring Road to Macleod Trail - Recommended Stage 1 Roadway Alignment and Interchange Configuration to 2035 Time Horizon". Government of Alberta. May 2009. Retrieved 2011-12-09. 
  52. ^ Government of Alberta (2009). "Government of Alberta: West Calgary Ring Road Highway 1 to Bow Trail" (PDF). Retrieved November 19, 2011. 
  53. ^ Government of Alberta (2009). "Government of Alberta: West Calgary Ring Road Bow Trail to Highway 8" (PDF). Retrieved November 19, 2011. 

External links[edit]