Alberta Nichols

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Alberta Nichols
Birth name Alberta Nichols
Born December 3, 1898
Lincoln, Illinois, U.S.
Died February 4, 1957(1957-02-04) (aged 58)
Hollywood, California, U.S.
Occupation(s) Composer

Alberta Nichols (December 3, 1898 – February 4, 1957) was a popular songwriter of the 1930s and 40s. Together with her husband, lyricist Mann Holiner, they composed over 100 songs, of which their most famous were "Until the Real Thing Comes Along" and "A Love Like Ours".

Biography[edit]

Advertisement in New York Times, March 17, 1926

Nichols was born in Lincoln, Illinois on December 3, 1898 [1] and studied piano [2] at the Louisville Conservatory with George Copeland and Alfred Calzin. Her career spanned writing for vaudeville, radio, musical theater and the movies. In 1931 Nichols and Holiner collaborated with Sammy Cahn, Saul Chaplin and L.E. Freeman for the Broadway show "Rhapsody in Black". The group of five also co-wrote "Until the Real Thing Comes Along". Alec Wilder, of American Popular Song [3] suggested that Nichols was the real composer of the song. Among the many singers who performed the song over the years, Billie Holiday recorded the song in 1942. Holiday was a close friend of the Nichols-Holiners.[4]

Nichols and Holiner wrote the music for several Broadway shows, including "Blackbirds of 1933", and "Angela", which starred Jeanette MacDonald.[5]

Collaborating with Cahn, Chapin and Freeman, the Nichols-Holiners team wrote the music for the film "Rhapsody in Black". "A Love Like Ours" considered by Virginia Grattan to be one of the best songs of the duo, was in the film "Two Girls and a Sailor" starring Van Johnson and June Allyson.[6]

Other songs from the Nichols-Holiner team were: "There Never Was a Town like Paris," "Sing a Little Tune," "You Can't Stop Me from Loving You," and "Why Shouldn't It Happen to Us?" (published in 1945, and recorded by Frank Sinatra)[7]

Alberta Nichols died in Hollywood on February 4, 1957. [8]

Music[edit]

Songs

  • "A Love Like Ours" (Two Girls and a Sailor)
  • "Until the Real Thing Comes Along"
  • "There Never Was a Town like Paris"
  • "Sing a Little Tune"
  • "You Can't Stop Me from Loving You"
  • "Why Shouldn't It Happen to Us?"
  • "I'm Walkin' The Chalk Line"
  • "Your Mother's Son-in-Law"
  • "I Just Couldn't Take it Baby"
  • "Sing a Little Tune"
  • "I Can't Believe its True" (Angela)
  • "Maybe So" (Angela)
  • "The Regal Romp" (Angela)

Broadway Shows that featured Nichols' music

  • Gay Paree (1926)
  • Angela
  • Luckee Girl
  • Rhapdsody in Black (1931)

Movies that featured Nichols' music

References[edit]

  1. ^ American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (1980). ASCAP biographical dictionary of composers, authors and publishers. Bowker. 
  2. ^ Ruth Anderson (1982). Contemporary American composers : a biographical dictionary. G.K.Hall. 
  3. ^ Alec Wilder (1972). American popular song : the great innovators, 1900-1950. Oxford University Press. p. 491. 
  4. ^ "Riverwalk Jazz Notes (Feb 17, 2011). "America's Unsung Women Composers"". 
  5. ^ Virginia L. Grattan (1993). American women songwriters : a biographical dictionary. Greenwood Press. p. 29. 
  6. ^ Virginia L. Grattan (1993). American women songwriters : a biographical dictionary. Greenwood Press. p. 29. 
  7. ^ Virginia L. Grattan (1993). American women songwriters : a biographical dictionary. Greenwood Press. p. 30. 
  8. ^ American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (1980). ASCAP biographical dictionary of composers, authors and publishers. Bowker. 
  • American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (1981). The ASCAP Biographical Dictionary of Composers, Authors and Publishers. RR Bowker, Lic. ISBN 0-8352-1283-1. 
  • Cohen, Aaron (1987). International Encyclopedia of Women Composers, 2nd Ed. Books & Music USA. ISBN 0-9617485-2-4. 
  • Laurence, Anya (1979). Women of Notes: 1,000 Women Composers Born Before 1900. Rosen Publishing Group. ISBN 0-8239-0463-6. 

External links[edit]