Albertson v. Subversive Activities Control Board

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Albertson v. Subversive Activities Control Board
Seal of the United States Supreme Court.svg
Argued October 18, 1965
Decided November 15, 1965
Full case name Albertson, et al. v. Subversive Activities Control Board
Citations 382 U.S. 70 (more)
86 S. Ct. 194; 15 L. Ed. 2d 165; 1965 U.S. LEXIS 263
Holding
Persons believed to be members of the Communist Party of the United States of America could not be required to register as party members with the SACB because that would violate their self-incrimination rights under the Fifth Amendment.
Court membership
Case opinions
Majority Brennan, joined by Warren, Black, Douglas, Clark, Harlan, Stewart, Fortas
Concurrence Black
Concurrence Clark
White took no part in the consideration or decision of the case.

Albertson v. Subversive Activities Control Board, 382 U.S. 70 (1965), was a case in which the Supreme Court of the United States ruled on November 15, 1965 that persons believed to be members of the Communist Party of the United States of America could not be required to register as party members with the Subversive Activities Control Board because that would violate their self-incrimination rights under the Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution.

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