Alcibiades DeBlanc

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Alcibiades DeBlanc
Alcibiades DeBlanc.jpg
Justice of the Louisiana Supreme Court
In office
1877–1880
Personal details
Born (1821-09-16)September 16, 1821
St. Martinville, Louisiana, U.S.
Died November 8, 1883(1883-11-08) (aged 62)
St. Martinville, Louisiana, U.S.
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Mathilde Briant
Children Derneville DeBlanc

Gilbert DeBlanc
Adrienne DeBlanc
Corinne DeBlanc
Raphael DeBlanc
Daniel DeBlanc
Mathilde DeBlanc
Jefferson DeBlanc

Residence (1) St. Martinville, Louisiana

(2) Franklin, Louisiana

Military service
Service/branch  Confederate States Army
Rank Confederate States of America Colonel.png Colonel
Battles/wars Battle of Gettysburg, American Civil War

Jean Maximilien Alcibiades Derneville DeBlanc (September 16, 1821 – November 8, 1883) was a lawyer, Louisiana Supreme Court Justice, served as a Colonel for the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War, and was the founder of the Knights of the White Camellia.[1]

Early life and family[edit]

Civil war[edit]

A lawyer and former state legislator, DeBlanc enlisted June 19, 1861 at Camp Moore, La. He was captain of Company C in the Eighth Louisiana Infantry, which became attached to the Army of Northern Virginia. He was promoted to major in 1862 and then lieutenant colonel at Fredericksburg April 6, 1863. He was captured at Banks Ford May 4, 1863 and paroled at Old Capitol Prison in Washington a short time later. He was present at the Battle of Gettysburg in July, 1863 where he assumed command of a regiment when the regiment's commander was killed. He suffered an arm wound and was promoted to the rank of colonel July 2, 1863 by President Jefferson Davis. Upon returning to Louisiana in 1864, he commanded Confederate reserve troops at Natchitoches. He surrendered to Union General Francis Herron in June, 1865 and aided Herron in maintaining order in the former Confederate areas of Louisiana until Union forces arrived.[2]Dictionary of Louisiana Biography,published by the Louisiana Historical Association in cooperation with the Center for Louisiana Studies at the University of Louisiana-Lafayette,1988. See page 222.

Knights of the White Camellia[edit]

DeBlanc was the founder and commander (from 1867-1868) of the Knights of the White Camellia. This was an organization founded to oppose the implementation of Congressional Reconstruction in Louisiana, much like the Ku Klux Klan and other such para-military groups in other states. The goal of the Knights of the White Camellia came to be victory for the Democratic party, by whatever means necessary, in the presidential election of November, 1868. This was achieved, but with more votes for the Democratic candidate, Horatio Seymour, than there were registered Democratic voters in the state. Violence and intimidation tactics were too extreme and led to a congressional investigation that overturned the results of the election in Louisiana. It is possible that the success of Klan-like groups in later years at overturning Republican control in favor of conservative Democrats stemmed (at least in part) from the example of the Knights of the White Camellia, which was no longer active after the 1868 election. Later groups, such as the White League in Louisiana and the White-Liners in Mississippi employed the same intimidation tactics against Republicans but were not as excessive, making it harder for investigations to find enough evidence to overturn election results. DeBlanc's fame among white conservatives in Louisiana led to his appointment as a justice of the Louisiana Supreme Court in 1877.[3]

Death[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=FB0B11FA385411738DDDA90994D9415B8384F0D3
  2. ^ Andrew Booth, compiler, Records of Louisiana confederate Soldiers and Louisiana Confederate Commands (New Orleans: no publisher, 1920)p. 572
  3. ^ J.Dauphine, "The Knights of the White Camellia in Louisiana, 1867-1869," M.A. Thesis, University of Louisiana-Lafayette, 1983.