Alexander Cassatt

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Alexander J. Cassatt
Portrait of Alexander Johnston Cassatt.jpg
Alexander Cassatt somewhere between 1890–1900
Born (1839-12-08)December 8, 1839
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Died December 28, 1906(1906-12-28) (aged 67)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Resting place
Church of the Redeemer Cemetery,
Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania
Occupation Railroad executive
Years active 1866-1906
Known for President of Pennsylvania Railroad
Spouse(s) Lois Buchanan (1847–1920)
Children Edward Buchanan (1869–1922)
Katherine Kelso (1871–1905)
Robert Kelso (1873–1944)
Elsie Foster (1875–1931)
Relatives Mary Cassatt, sister
Honors SS A. J. Cassatt

Alexander Johnston Cassatt (December 8, 1839 – December 28, 1906) was the seventh president of the Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR), serving from June 9, 1899 to December 28, 1906.[1][2] The painter Mary Cassatt was his sister.

Pennsylvania Railroad[edit]

Frequently referred to as A. J. Cassatt, the great accomplishment under his stewardship was the planning and construction of tunnels under the Hudson River to finally bring PRR's trunk line into New York City. His purchase of a controlling interest in the Long Island Rail Road and the construction of tunnels under the East River created a PRR commuter network on Long Island. Unfortunately, Cassatt died before his grand Pennsylvania Station in New York City was completed.

Pennsylvania Station, New York, NY (1911, demolished 1963).

Cassatt joined the PRR in 1861 as an engineer and rapidly rose through the ranks to become Pennsy First Vice-President by 1880. He was disappointed to be passed over for the presidency and resigned from the company in 1882. During his absence he devoted his time to horse raising but still was able to organize a new railroad the New York, Philadelphia and Norfolk Railroad (NYP&N), that connected southern markets with the north. Despite no longer being an executive with PRR, he was elected to the PRR’s board of directors and was recalled in 1899 to serve as president.[3]

Cassatt more than doubled the PRR's total assets during his term, from US$276 million to US$594 million (an increase of 115 percent). Track and equipment investment increased by 146 percent. The route from New York through Philadelphia, Harrisburg and Altoona to Pittsburgh was made double-tracked throughout; to Washington, DC, four-tracked—Pennsy's "Broad Way." Many other lines were double-tracked; almost every part of the system was improved. New freight cutoffs avoided stations; grade crossings were eliminated, flyovers were built to streamline common paths through junctions, terminals were redesigned, and much more. Cassatt initiated the Pennsy's program of electrification which led to the road being the United States' most electrified system.

Alexander Cassatt was succeeded as Pennsylvania Railroad president by James McCrea.

Family[edit]

Alexander Cassatt was born on December 8, 1839 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He married Lois Buchanan, daughter of the Rev. Edward Y. Buchanan and Ann Eliza Foster. Lois Buchanan was a niece of James Buchanan, 15th President of the United States, and through her mother, a niece of songwriter Stephen Foster.[4] The couple had two sons and two daughters.

Chesterbrook Farm[edit]

Cassatt's Rittenhouse Square townshouse at 202 South 19th St., Philadelphia, PA (demolished 1972). Now the site of The Rittenhouse Hotel.

A. J. Cassatt was a horse enthusiast and fox hunter who owned Chesterbrook Farm in Berwyn, Pennsylvania where he bred Thoroughbred racehorses. The 600-acre (240 ha) property is today the site of a subdivision with office buildings and homes using the Chesterbrook Farm name. The original main barn designed by Philadelphia architect Frank Furness has been maintained and restored. (Furness also designed Cassatt's Rittenhouse Square townhouse.)

Cassatt initially raced under the pseudonym, Mr. Kelso, and his horses as from the Kelso Stable.[5] He owned the 1886 Preakness Stakes winner, The Bard and the 1889 Belmont Stakes 1889 winner Eric. As well, he bred the winner of the 1875, 1876, 1878, and 1880 Preakness Stakes and Foxford who won the 1891 Belmont.

In addition to flat-racing his Thoroughbreds, in 1895 A. J. Cassatt helped found the National Steeplechase Association to organize competitive steeplechase racing. He was also responsible for the introduction of the Hackney pony to the United States. In 1878 he acquired 239 Stella in Britain and brought her to Philadelphia. In 1891, Cassatt and several fellow Hackney enthusiasts founded the American Hackney Horse Society. The organization and registry continues to this day with its headquarters now in Lexington, Kentucky.

Death[edit]

Alexander Cassatt died in 1906 at his Rittenhouse Square townhouse in Philadelphia, after a six-month illness.[6]:279 He was interred in the Church of the Redeemer Cemetery in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. His widow died in 1920.[6]:315

Legacy[edit]

In World War II, the United States liberty ship SS A. J. Cassatt was named in his honor.

Gramercy Mansion in Baltimore, Maryland was built by Alexander Cassatt in 1902.

In 1910, the Pennsylvania Railroad erected a statue of Cassatt designed by Adolph Alexander Weinman at the new Pennsylvania Station, New York.[7] The statue had the following inscription:

Alexander Johnston Cassatt

President, Pennsylvania Railroad Company 1899–1906
Whose Foresight, Courage and Ability achieved the extension of the Pennsylvania Railroad into New York City

The statue is currently located at the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania in Strasburg, Pennsylvania.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Alexander Cassatt Lived in Altoona; Brief History and Reminiscence of One of Pennsylvania Railroad's Presidents". Altoona Tribune. December 15, 1916. Retrieved October 1, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Alexander J. Cassatt" (PDF). New York Times. June 18, 1899. Retrieved June 30, 2008. 
  3. ^ Joseph S. Kennedy (January 12, 2003). "Pennsylvania Railroad came of age under legendary leader Alexander Johnston Cassatt…". Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved October 1, 2013. 
  4. ^ "Niece of President Buchanan Dead". New York Times. April 25, 1906. Retrieved April 23, 2011. 
  5. ^ "Mr. A. J. Cassatt to retire". Pittsburgh Post. October 21, 1889. Retrieved October 3, 2013. 
  6. ^ a b Mathews, Nancy Mowll (1994). Mary Cassatt: A Life. New York: Villard Books. ISBN 0-300-07754-8. 
  7. ^ Staff (July 27, 1910). "Cassatt Statue in Station. The Only One to Stand in the New Pennsylvania Terminal Here". New York Times. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Frank Thomson
President of Pennsylvania Railroad
1899–1906
Succeeded by
James McCrea