Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing

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The AG Bell's headquarters, Bell's Volta Bureau building of 1893 in Washington, D.C., with the association's name plaque shown to the right.

The Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, also known as AG Bell, is a resource, support network and advocate for listening, learning, talking and living independently with hearing loss. Through publications, advocacy, training, scholarships and financial aid, AG Bell promotes the use of spoken language as well as hearing technology for children with hearing loss. It is headquartered in Washington, D.C., with chapters located throughout the United States and a network of international affiliates.

The Association also sponsors the AG Bell College Scholarship Awards Program for a number of deaf and hard of hearing full-time students pursuing undergraduate or graduate degrees. In 2010, 18 awards were granted ranging from $1,000 to $10,000.[1]

The Association was originally created as the American Association to Promote the Teaching of Speech to the Deaf (AAPTSD). In 1908 it merged with Alexander Graham Bell's Volta Bureau (founded in 1887 "for the increase and diffusion of knowledge relating to the deaf"), and was renamed as the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf in 1956 at the suggestion of Mrs. Frances Toms, the mother of a deaf son who was able to achieve high academic standings in normal non-deaf schools with the organization's help.[2] In 1999 the Association was finally renamed to the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Greenville Tech Financial Aid: Financial Aid Blog, Greenville Technical College, Greenville, S.C. Retrieved from Greenville Technical College website, February 4, 2011.
  2. ^ "Bell Ceremony: Give Glimpses of Life Of Telephone Inventor; "Always Loved Canada" ", Brantford Expositor, 14 September 1953, pp. 13, 19.
  3. ^ "AGBell".  Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing website. Retrieved on April 3, 2010.



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