Alexander Graham Bell School (Chicago, Illinois)

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A part of Alexander graham bell school featuring a y-shape in the architecture, common in Chicago architecture
This article is about the Alexander Graham Bell School in Chicago, Illinois. For other schools with the same name, see this list.
Bell School
Established 1917
Type Public Elementary
Principal Sandra A. Caudill [1]
Faculty 50+
Students 950+
Grades K-8
Location 3730 North Oakley Avenue
Chicago, Illinois, USA
Campus City
Colors Red and White
Website http://www.agbellschool.com/

Alexander Graham Bell School is a public school located in the North Center section of Chicago, Illinois, United States; it is a part of the Chicago Public Schools. It offers grades kindergarten through grade eight. It also has a deaf department for students in preschool through grade eight and additionally a gifted department for students in grades one through eight.

The elementary school was founded in 1917 with 24 classrooms for hearing students and 15 classrooms for deaf students, after the Chicago School Board allocated US$285,000 for it in 1915 (approximately $6,640,000 in current dollars).[2][3][4]

The school, one of the largest built in the Chicago Public School system at the time, was dedicated on April 1, 1918 by its name source Alexander Graham Bell, the inventor of the telephone and a strong advocate of education for deaf students.[5]

Sports[edit]

Bell School offers a variety of sports, including basketball, cross country, flag football, soccer, softball, track and field and volleyball.

Special events[edit]

Since 2003 Martyrs', a music venue on Lincoln Avenue, has hosted "Bands for Bell" where Bell parent bands play as a fundraiser for the Bell School.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ A.G. Bell School. A.G. Bell School -Administrators, A.G. Bell School website, retrieved May 9, 2011.
  2. ^ Consumer Price Index (estimate) 1800–2014. Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. Retrieved February 27, 2014.
  3. ^ Chicago Tribune. School Board Decides To Hold All Vacant Land, Chicago Tribune, October 1, 1915, pg.11 (subscription).
  4. ^ Bell, Alexander G., Elementary School, retrieved from CPSAlumni.org website May 11, 2011.
  5. ^ Electrical Review. Electrical Review -Volume 72, International Trade Press, 1918, pg.704.

External links[edit]