Alexander Hamilton Church

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Alexander Hamilton Church (1866–1936) was an English efficiency engineer, accountant and author. He became known as one of the pioneers in reducing the commercial organization of factories to the basis of a science, a work in which he was associated with J. Slater Lewis. He also worked with Hans Renold, who is credited for introducing scientific management to England.[1]

Church was born and raised in England and came to the United States in 1910. Together with L.P. Alford he developed as systems of management principles partly based on the ideas of Charles Babbage. Their theory contrasted Taylor's shop management principles,[1] and paved the way to modern industrial management.[2] Church first book "The Proper Distribution of Expense Burden" was published as a series of articles in The Engineering Magazine in 1901, and as book in 1908. This became a reference for accounting both in The United States and England.[3]

Publications[edit]

His writings include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Richard Vangermeersch (1996) "Church, Alexander Hamilton (1866-1936." In History of Accounting: An International Encyclopedia, edited by Michael Chatfield and Richard Vangermeersch. New York: Garland Publishing, 1996. p. 124.
  2. ^ William Jaffe (1957). L.P. Alford and the Evolution of Modern Industrial Management. New York University Press.
  3. ^ Jayanta K Nanda (2006) Management Thought. p.81

Further reading[edit]

  • T. Boyns (2003) In memoriam: Alexander Hamilton Church's system of 'scientific machine rates' at Hans Renold Ltd., c.1901 - c.1920 Accounting Historians Journal 30: 3-44
  • Jelinek M (1980) Toward Systematic Management: Alexander Hamilton Church Business History Review 54: 63-79]
  • Vangermeersch, Richard. "Church, Alexander Hamilton (1866-1936." In History of Accounting: An International Encyclopedia, edited by Michael Chatfield and Richard Vangermeersch. New York: Garland Publishing, 1996. pp. 124–125.