Alexander Keyssar

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Alexander Keyssar (born May 13, 1947)[1] is an American historian, and the Matthew W. Stirling Jr. Professor of History and Social Policy at Harvard University.[2]

Life[edit]

He graduated from Harvard University with a PhD in the History of American Civilization. He taught at Brandeis University, Duke University, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology.[3]

He chaired the Social Science Research Council's National Research Commission on Voting and Elections. His current research interests include election reform, the history of democracies, and the history of poverty.

He writes for the Huffington Post.[4]

Awards[edit]

  • 1987 Frederick Jackson Turner Award; Philip Taft Labor History Prize for Out of Work
  • 2001 Beveridge Prize for The Right to Vote; Eugene Genovese Prize for The Right to Vote
  • 2001 Pulitzer Prize finalist for The Right to Vote: The Contested History of Democracy in the United States
  • 2001 Los Angeles Times Book Award finalist for The Right to Vote: The Contested History of Democracy in the United States
  • 2001 Parkman Prize, Finalist
  • 2005 Fulbright Specialists University of Lisbon [5]

Works[edit]

Anthologies[edit]

Co-author[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]