Alexander McKelway

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Alexander McKelway (October 6, 1866 - April 16, 1918) was a Presbyterian minister, journalist, and activist for child labor reform.

Childhood and Family[edit]

McKelway was born in Salisbury, Pennsylvania to John Ryan McKelway and Catherine Scott Comfort McKelway. He grew up in Albemarle County, Virginia and Charlotte County, Virginia. Graduated from Hampden-Sidney College and attended Union Theological Seminary in Richmond.[1]

He married Lavinia Rutherford Smith and had five children including Alexander McKelway, the writer St. Clair McKelway and the journalist Benjamin Mosby McKelway.[2]

Career[edit]

After a short time as a Presbyterian minister, McKelway became a writer and editor with the The Presbyterian Standard and then The Charlotte News.[3] He soon became involved in child labor reform. He became Southern regional organizer for the National Child Labor Committee (NCLC) In 1909 McKelway moved the family to Washington D.C. to continue his work with the NCLC. His efforts resulted in the creation of the United States Children's Bureau. Many credit McKelway with the passage of the Keating-Owen Act.[4]

McKelway and his family lived in the Georgetown neighborhood.[5]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, Volume 4, edited by William Stevens Powell, Univ of North Carolina Press, p. 157-158.
  2. ^ Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, Volume 4, edited by William Stevens Powell, Univ of North Carolina Press, p. 157-158.
  3. ^ Child Labor: A World History Companion By Sandy Hobbs, Jim McKechnie, Michael Lavalette
  4. ^ Child Labor: A World History Companion By Sandy Hobbs, Jim McKechnie, Michael Lavalette
  5. ^ Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, Volume 4, edited by William Stevens Powell, Univ of North Carolina Press, p. 157-158.