Alexander Nevsky Lavra

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View of the monastery in the early 19th century
Modern view of the Lavra
The silver sarcophagus of St. Alexander Nevsky now located in the State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg

Coordinates: 59°55′16″N 30°23′17″E / 59.921°N 30.388°E / 59.921; 30.388 Saint Alexander Nevsky Lavra or Saint Alexander Nevsky Monastery was founded by Peter I of Russia in 1710 at the eastern end of the Nevsky Prospekt in St. Petersburg supposing that that was the site of the Neva Battle in 1240 when Alexander Nevsky, a prince, defeated the Swedes; however, the battle actually took place about 12 miles away from that site.[1] The monastery was founded also to house the relics of St. Alexander Nevsky, patron of the newly founded Russian capital; however, the massive silver sarcophagus of St. Alexander Nevsky[2] was relocated during Soviet times to the State Hermitage Museum where it remains (without the relics) today.

In 1797, the monastery was raised to the rank of lavra, making it only the third lavra in the Russian Church, in which that designation had previously been bestowed only upon Kiev Monastery of the Caves and the Trinity Monastery of St Sergius.

The monastery grounds contain two baroque churches, designed by father and son Trezzini and built in 1717–22 and 1742–50, respectively; a majestic Neoclassical cathedral, built in 1778–90 to a design by Ivan Starov and consecrated to the Holy Trinity; and numerous structures of lesser importance. It also contains the Lazarev and Tikhvin Cemeteries, where ornate tombs of Leonhard Euler, Mikhail Lomonosov, Alexander Suvorov, Nikolay Karamzin, Modest Mussorgsky, Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Karl Ivanovic Rossi, Prince Garsevan Chavchavadze, a Georgian aristocrat, Sergei Witte and other famous Russians are preserved.

Today Alexander Nevsky Lavra sits on Alexander Nevsky Square where shoppers can buy bread baked by the monks. Visitors may also visit the cathedral and cemeteries for a small admission fee. While many of the grave sites are situated behind large concrete walls, especially those of famous Russians, many can be seen by passers-by while strolling down Obukovskoy Oburoni Street.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1] "Alexander Nevsky Monastery, St. Petersburg", Retrieved 2011-07-17
  2. ^ [2] "Photo of the Sarcophagus of St. Alexander Nevsky located in St. Petersburg", Retrieved 2011-07-17

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