Alexander Tatarenko

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Alexander Alexandrovich Tatarenko
Tatarenko-Alexander-Alexandrovich-30w.jpg
Born October 5, 1925
Ochakov, Nikolaev oblast, USSR
Died December 1, 1999
Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation
Nationality Russian
Field Painting
Training Vera Mukhina Institute
Movement Realism

Alexander Alexandrovich Tatarenko (Russian: Алекса́ндр Алекса́ндрович Тата́ренко; October 5, 1925, Ochakov, Nikolaev oblast, USSR – December 1, 1999, Saint Petersburg, USSR) - Soviet, Russian painter, restorer, Art teacher, lived and worked in Leningrad, a member of the Saint Petersburg Union of Artists (before 1992 - Leningrad branch of Union of Artists of Russian Federation),[1] regarded as one of representatives of the Leningrad school of painting.[2]

Biography[edit]

Alexander Alexandrovich Tatarenko was born October 5, 1925, in Ochakov city, Nikolaev oblast of southern Ukraine, USSR. Since 1933 Alexander Tatarenko lived in Leningrad.

In 1955 Alexander Tatarenko graduated from Vera Mukhina Institute in Leningrad in Alexander Kazantsev workshop. He studied of Stepan Privedentsev, Ivan Stepashkin, Piotr Buchkin, Kiril Iogansen.[3]

Since 1960 Alexander Tatarenko has participated in Art Exhibitions. He painted portraits, landscapes, seascapes, cityscapes, genre compositions. Alexander Tatarenko worked as easel and monumental painter, restorer, Art teacher. His solo exhibitions were in Leningrad (1962, 1981), Odessa (1963, 1982).

Alexander Tatarenko was a member of the Saint Petersburg Union of Artists (before 1992 - Leningrad branch of Union of Artists of Russian Federation) since 1955,[4] a Member of Peter's Academy of Sciences and Arts (1996).[5]

Alexander Alexandrovich Tatarenko died on December 1, 1999 at the seventy-fifth year of life. His paintings reside in Art museums of Saint Petersburg, Petrozavodsk, Nikolaev, Ochakov, Lvov,[6] in private collections in Russia, France, Ukraine, Finland, Germany, USA,[7] England,[8] Japan, and throughout the world.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Directory of Members of the Union of Artists of USSR. Volume 2.- Moscow: Soviet artist, 1979. - p.416.
  2. ^ Sergei V. Ivanov. Unknown Socialist Realism. The Leningrad School.- Saint Petersburg: NP-Print Edition, 2007. – pp. 254, 277, 370, 394, 396, 397, 400, 402, 403, 405, 406, 444.
  3. ^ Sergei V. Ivanov. Unknown Socialist Realism. The Leningrad School.- Saint Petersburg: NP-Print Edition, 2007. – p.370.
  4. ^ Directory of members of the Leningrad branch of Union of Artists of Russian Federation. - Leningrad: Khudozhnik RSFSR, 1987. - p.129.
  5. ^ Artists of Peter's Academy of Arts and Sciences. - Saint Petersburg: Ladoga Publishing House, 2008. - pp.174–175.
  6. ^ Alexander Alexandrovich Tatarenko. Exhibition of works. Catalogue. - Leningrad: Khudozhnik RSFSR, 1981. - p.9-16.
  7. ^ Vern G. Swanson. Soviet Impressionism. - Woodbridge, England: Antique Collectors' Club, 2001. - p.183.
  8. ^ Soviet realist and impressionist paintings. - London: Phillips Auction, 1994.
  9. ^ Sergei V. Ivanov. Unknown Socialist Realism. The Leningrad School. - Saint Petersburg: NP-Print Edition, 2007. – p.6-7.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Alexander Alexandrovich Tatarenko. Exhibition of works. Catalogue. - Leningrad: Khudozhnik RSFSR, 1981.
  • Directory of members of the Leningrad branch of Union of Artists of Russian Federation. - Leningrad: Khudozhnik RSFSR, 1987. - p. 129.
  • Soviet realist and impressionist paintings. - London: Phillips Auction, 1994.
  • Matthew C. Bown. Dictionary of 20th Century Russian and Soviet Painters 1900-1980s. - London: Izomar, 1998. ISBN 0-9532061-0-6, ISBN 978-0-9532061-0-0.
  • Vern G. Swanson. Soviet Impressionism. - Woodbridge, England: Antique Collectors' Club, 2001. - p. 183. ISBN 1-85149-280-1, ISBN 978-1-85149-280-0.
  • Artists of Peter's Academy of Arts and Sciences. - Saint Petersburg: Ladoga Publishing House, 2008. - pp. 174–175.
  • Sergei V. Ivanov. Unknown Socialist Realism. The Leningrad School. - Saint Petersburg: NP-Print Edition, 2007. – pp. 254, 277, 370, 394, 396, 397, 400, 402, 403, 405, 406, 444. ISBN 5-901724-21-6, ISBN 978-5-901724-21-7.

External links[edit]