Alexander Vlasov (politician)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Alexander Vlasov
Chairman of the Council of Ministers – Government of the Russian SFSR
In office
October 1988 – June 1990
President Mikhail Gorbachev
Preceded by Vitaly Vorotnikov
Succeeded by Ivan Silayev
Minister of Interior Affairs
In office
January 1986 – 10 October 1988
Preceded by Vitaly Fedorchuk
Succeeded by Vadim Bakatin
Personal details
Born (1932-01-20)20 January 1932
Babushkin, Buryatia, Russia
Died 9 June 2002(2002-06-09) (aged 70)
Moscow, Russia
Nationality Russian
Political party Communist Party
Alma mater Irkutsk Mining Metallurgical Institute

Alexander Vladimirovich Vlasov (20 January 1932 – 9 June 2002) was a Soviet politician, who held different positions, including interior minister and prime minister. He was the last communist prime minister of Russia,[1] and a close ally of Mikhail Gorbachev.[2]

Early life and education[edit]

Vlasov was born into a Russian family in Babushkin, Buryat-Mongol ASSR, Russian SFSR (now Buryatia, Russia) on 20 January 1932.[3][4] He attended the Irkutsk Mining Metallurgical Institute and graduated with a degree in mining engineering in 1954.[4][5]

Career[edit]

Vlasov worked as a foreman in an eastern Siberia mine.[6] In 1956, he joined the communist party.[5] In 1965, he was named as second secretary of Yakut party obkom.[4] He also worked a member of the military council of the North Caucasian military district when Gorbachev was working there.[5] Vlasov began to work at the central committee of the communist party in Moscow in 1972.[4][7] He was promoted to first secretary of the party in 1975.[4] Then Vlasov became first secretary of the party in Rostov in southern Russia in 1984.[8]

In January 1986, he was appointed interior minister, replacing Vitaly Fedorchuk in the post.[9][10][11] Vlasov was appointed to the Politburo as a non-voting member in late September 1988.[12][13] His tenure as interior minister lasted until 10 October 1988.[14] Vadim Bakatin replaced him as interior minister.[15]

Vlasov was elected as prime minister of the Russian Republic by the supreme Soviet on 3 October 1988.[16][17] He succeeded Vitaly Vorotnikov in the post.[8]

Then Vlasov was nominated for presidency of the supreme Soviet in May 1990.[18] However, he lost the election to Boris Yeltsin who outpolled him, 535 votes to 467, receiving just 4 votes more than the minimum required for election.[19][20][21]

Death[edit]

Vlasov died in Moscow on 9 June 2002.[3]

Decorations and awards[edit]

This article incorporates information from the equivalent article on the Russian Wikipedia.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Richard Sakwa (2008). Russian politics and society. Routledge. p. 16. ISBN 978-0-415-41528-6. Retrieved 31 March 2013. 
  2. ^ John B. Dunlop (1993). The Rise of Russia and the Fall of the Soviet Empire. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. p. 17. Retrieved 12 September 2013.  – via Questia (subscription required)
  3. ^ a b "Index V". Rulers. Retrieved 31 March 2013. 
  4. ^ a b c d e Martin McCauley (1997). Who's who in Russia since 1900. Routledge Chapman & Hall. p. 219. ISBN 978-0-415-13897-0. Retrieved 31 March 2013. 
  5. ^ a b c "Loyalists Get Positions of Power". Philly (Moscow). 1 October 1988. Retrieved 31 March 2013. 
  6. ^ Goldstein, Steve (4 October 1988). "Gorbachev Reshapes Leadership In Largest of 15 Soviet Republics". Philly (Moscow). Retrieved 31 March 2013. 
  7. ^ Eaton, William J. (26 January 1986). "Soviet Interior Minister Shifted to Other Duties". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 7 July 2013. 
  8. ^ a b "Gorbachev Gains More Power". Chicago Tribune. 4 October 1988. Retrieved 31 March 2013. 
  9. ^ Starov, Vadim. "MDV. The Ministry of Internal Affairs". Systema Spetnaz. Retrieved 31 March 2013. 
  10. ^ Schodolski, Vincent J. (3 October 1988). "Soviets May Be Reshaping KGB". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 31 March 2013. 
  11. ^ David A Dyker (1987). The Soviet Union Under Gorbachev: The Real Prospects for Reform. Croom Helm, Limited. p. 27. ISBN 978-0-7099-4519-2. Retrieved 13 April 2013. 
  12. ^ Parks, Michael (4 October 1988). "Gromyko Assailed in Pravda Interview". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 31 March 2013. 
  13. ^ "Politburo Membership". Philly. 24 September 1989. Retrieved 12 April 2013. 
  14. ^ "New Russian premier relieved of duties as interior minister". Associated Press. 10 October 1988. Retrieved 31 March 2013. 
  15. ^ Galeotti, Mark (1993). "Perestroika, Perestrelka, Pereborka: Policing Russia in a Time of Change". Europe-Asia Studies 45 (5): 769–786. doi:10.1080/09668139308412123. Retrieved 1 April 2013. 
  16. ^ "Gorbachev ally new Russian premier". Deseret News. 3 October 1988. Retrieved 31 March 2013. 
  17. ^ Porubcansky, Mark J. (3 October 1988). "Vorotnikov moved upstairs, Vlasov becomes premier of Russian Republic". Associated News (Moscow). Retrieved 12 April 2013. 
  18. ^ Donald Murray (28 August 1995). Democracy of Despots. MQUP. p. 99. ISBN 978-0-7735-6568-5. Retrieved 31 March 2013. 
  19. ^ Conor O'Clery (2011). Moscow, December 25, 1991: the last day of the Soviet Union. Public Affairs. p. 11. ISBN 978-1-61039-012-5. Retrieved 31 March 2013. 
  20. ^ Dahlburg, John Thor (30 May 1990). "Yeltsin Is Elected Russia President". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 31 March 2013. 
  21. ^ Garcelon, Marc (2005). Revolutionary Passage: From Soviet to Post-Soviet Russia, 1985-2000. Philadelphia: Temple University Press. p. 99. Retrieved 30 August 2013.   – via Questia (subscription required)