Alexei Alekhine

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Alexei Alekhine
Country  Russia
Born c. 1888
Died c. 1939
Russia

Alexei (Alexey) Alekhine (1888–1939) was a Russian chess master and the brother of World Chess Champion Alexander Alekhine.

His father was a wealthy landowner, a Marshal of the Nobility and a member of the State Duma, and his mother was an heiress to an industrial fortune. Both he and his younger brother Alexander were taught chess by their mother.

Alexei drew with Harry Nelson Pillsbury when the American master gave a simultaneous blindfold display in Moscow in 1902. He tied for fourth in the Moscow Chess Club Autumn tournament in 1907, while Alexander tied for eleventh. Alexei finished third at Moscow 1913 (Oldřich Duras won), and tied for third at Moscow 1915. He was an editor of the chess journal "Shakhmatny Vyestnik" from 1913 to 1916.[1]

After the October Revolution, he won (elimination - third group) and took third place in the tournament for amateurs in Moscow, held in October 1920,[2] while his brother Alexander won the first USSR Chess Championship (All-Russian Chess Olympiad) there.[3]

He took third place at Petrograd (Saint Petersburg) 1923, took 12th at Moscow 1924, tied for fourth-fifth at Kharkov 1925 (the second Ukrainian Chess Championship, Yakov Vilner won), took 11th at Odessa 1926 (Ukrainian championship, Boris Verlinsky and Marsky won), and took 8th at Poltava 1927 (Ukrainian championship, won by Alexey Selezniev).[4][5] He won the championship of Kharkov in the Ukraine and served as an Executive Board member of the USSR Chess Federation. He was also the Secretary of the Ukrainian Chess Federation and the editor of the first Soviet chess annual, published in 1927.[1]

Alexei died in 1939.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Bill Wall's Chess Master Profiles - Alekhine (Sep 24, 2005)". Archived from the original on 2009-10-25. 
  2. ^ "Title Unknown". Archived from the original on 2009-10-25. 
  3. ^ Chess Tournaments: Russian olympiad 1920 - crosstable
  4. ^ http://www.geocities.com/al2055km/ch_repub.html RUSbase. Archived 2009-10-25.
  5. ^ http://www.anders.thulin.name/SUBJECTS/CHESS/CTCIndex.pdf Name Index to Jeremy Gaige's Chess Tournament Crosstables, An Electronic Edition, Anders Thulin, Malmö, 2004-09-01