Alexis Gray-Lawson

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Alexis Gray-Lawson
Guard
Born (1987-04-21) April 21, 1987 (age 27)
Oakland, California
Nationality United States American
Height 5 ft 8 in (1.73 m)
Weight 176 lb (80 kg)
College California
Draft 30th overall, 2010
Washington Mystics
WNBA career 2011–present
Profile WNBA player profile
WNBA teams
Phoenix Mercury (2011–2012)

Alexis Gray-Lawson is a basketball player who most recently played for the Phoenix Mercury of the Women's National Basketball Association. She was the 2010 recipient of the Frances Pomeroy Naismith award, which is presented by the WBCA annually to 'the nation's most outstanding NCAA Division I female basketball player who stands 5'8" tall or under".[1]

Childhood[edit]

Alexis Amber Gray-Lawson was born April 21, 1987 in Oakland, California. Her parents are Orlando Gray and Roslyn Lawson. She has eight siblings, Kameron, Kenya, Layce, Violet, Vanessa, Kevin, William, and Kenny. Jason Kidd is a close family friend, she is related to Willie Magee who played for the St. Louis Cardinals.

High School Career[edit]

Gray-Lawson went to Oakland Tech for her entire high school career, and earned the 2005 second team Parade All-American and All-State Honors as she and California teammate Devanei Hampton led Oakland Tech to their second state title. She was ranked 17th nationally by the Blue Star Index and 25th by Mike White's All-Star Girls Report. She was listed as 5th by the NorCal Scouting Report. She was MVP of the 2004 California state Championships, named to the 2005 McDonald's All-American game, and the Senior Slam All-Star game in 2005. Oakland Tech retired her jersey, as they lost only one home game while she was there. She also played softball, earning three all-city honors and league MVP as a senior with the softball team. She completed on the volleyball team as a freshman as well.

College career[edit]

Gray-Lawson spent a total of five years at the University of California, Berkeley. During her sophomore year she would play only nine games before suffering a season-ending injury. She would be red-shirted for the remainder of her sophomore season. Gray-Lawson was on the All-Pac-10 First Team in 2009 and 2010, the Pac-10 All-Defensive team in 2010, All-Pac-10 Second Team in 2008, Pac-10 All-Freshmen Team in 2006, All-Pac-10 Honorable Mention in 2006, and was the Pac-10 Freshman of the Year in 2006. Named to the Women's Basketball News Service All-Freshman Team in 2006, Associated Press All-American Honorable Mention in 2009, and she was a WNIT Champion in 2010. She was first on the California Golden Bears career list for three-pointers made with a total of 148, and named one of the top five 2-guards in the nation by ESPN.com in a 2008-2009 women's basketball preseason ranking.

USA Basketball[edit]

Gray-Lawson was named a member of the team representing the USA at the 2009 World University Games held in Belgrade, Serbia. The team won all seven games to earn the gold medal. Gray-Lawson averaged 7.9 points per game and 4.3 rebounds per game.[2]

WNBA career[edit]

Gray-Lawson was selected the third round of the 2010 WNBA Draft (30th overall) by the Washington Mystics.[3] She was cut prior to the season. The Phoenix Mercury signed Gray-Lawson to a training camp contract and she would make the team. She played in 27 games with the Mercury, scoring her first WNBA career points on June 24, 2011 in Atlanta.

International career[edit]

Gray-Lawson went to play for Samsun Basketbol in the Turkish Women's League during the 2010-2011 off-season after she was waived by the Washington Mystics. For her second year overseas, following her rookie season with the WNBA she is playing in Israel with H. R. Le-Zion for 2011-2012.

Vital Statistics[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Frances Pomeroy Naismith". Women's Basketball Coaches Association. Retrieved 30 Jun 2014. 
  2. ^ "TWENTY-FIFTH WORLD UNIVERSITY GAMES -- 2009". USA Basketball. Retrieved 17 Oct 2013. 
  3. ^ http://www.wnba.com draft2010/draft_board.html 2010 WNBA Draft board

External links[edit]