Alfréd Schaffer

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Alfréd Schaffer
Personal information
Full name Alfréd Schaffer
Date of birth (1893-02-13)13 February 1893
Place of birth Bratislava, Austria-Hungary
Date of death 30 August 1945(1945-08-30) (aged 52)
Place of death Prien am Chiemsee, Germany
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
Tussen 1908
Tipografia SK
Lipotvaros TC
Ferencváros
Budapest TC
KAOE
Fovarosi TC
FSK
Terecvaros TC
Tatabanya SK
Budapest AC
1915–1919? MTK 154 (89)
1919–1920 1. FC Nürnberg
Wacker München
Eintracht Frankfurt
Hamburger SV
Bayern Munich
FC Basel
Sparta Prague
Austria Vienna
New York Giants
National team
1915–1919 Hungary 15 (17)
Teams managed
DSV München
Wacker München
Hertha BSC Berlin
Wacker München
1932–1935 1. FC Nürnberg
1935–1937 MTK Budapest FC
1938 Hungary
1939–1940 Rapid Bucharest
1940–1942 AS Roma
1943–1944 Ferencváros
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only. † Appearances (Goals).

Alfréd Schaffer (13 February 1893 – 30 August 1945) was a Hungarian international footballer.[1] He is recorded as having played for a record number of clubs: 21 in a 15 year career which lasted from 1910 to 1925.[2]

He joined MTK Hungária FC in 1915 and helped the club win three consecutive league titles,[1] and in the latter two of those seasons (1917–18 and 1918–19) he was the top European league goalscorer.[3]

After his playing days ended he became a football manager, and coached clubs such as 1. FC Nürnberg (for whom he also played), AS Roma and Ferencváros.

He coached Hungary at the 1938 FIFA World Cup.[4]

He became manager of Roma in 1940, and led them to the 1941–42 Serie A title, before leaving the club in 1942.[5]

He died in the town of Prien am Chiemsee on 30 August 1945.[6]

Honours[edit]

  • Hungarian League Championship – 1917, 1918, 1919 (with MTK)[1]
  • German League Championship – 1921 (with 1. FC Nürnberg)
  • Austrian League Championship – 1924 (with Amateure)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Schaffer, Alfred 'Spezi'". Encyclopedia of Jews in sports. Jewsinsports.org. Retrieved 16 July 2012. 
  2. ^ Maxim Olenev (14 June 2007). "OTHER SOCCER RECORDS". RSSSF. Retrieved 3 February 2012. 
  3. ^ "European Topscorers before 1967/68". RSSSF. Archived from the original on 31 December 2008. Retrieved 28 December 2008. 
  4. ^ "Football’s Greatest Managers…#9 Vittorio Pozzo". The Equaliser. 9 September 2010. Archived from the original on 16 December 2010. Retrieved 19 December 2010. 
  5. ^ "Allenatori dell' AS Roma 1927" (in Italian). ASR Talenti. Retrieved 3 February 2013. 
  6. ^ Heimann, Helmut (2001). Tarzan, Puskás, Hansi Müller: Stelldichein donauschwäbischer (in German). Oswald Hartmann Verlag. pp. 157–170. ISBN 3-925921-49-4. Retrieved 3 February 2013.