Alfred Brinckmann

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Alfred Brinckmann (3 January 1891 – 30 May 1967) was a German chess International Master, author and functionary from Kiel.

The chess player[edit]

He participated eight times in the German Chess Championship in the period 1921-1949. His greatest success took place at Berlin 1927, where he took first place ahead of considerable masters such as Aron Nimzowitsch, Efim Bogoljubow and Friedrich Sämisch.[1]

During World War II, when Ehrhardt Post was the Chief Executive of the Grossdeutscher Schachbund,[2] Brinckmann took 16th at Bad Oeynhausen 1940 (7th GER-ch, Georg Kieninger won); took 3rd at Hamburg 1941 (Klaus Junge and Herbert Heinicke won); took 7th at Warsaw/Lublin/Kraków 1942 (the 3rd General Government chess tournament, Alexander Alekhine won), and took 3rd at Madrid 1943 (Paul Keres won).[3]

In 1953 he became an International Master. In 1965 he was appointed an honorary member of the Kieler Schachgesellschaft.

The author[edit]

He wrote numerous books, among them several biographies (i.e. about Efim Bogoljubov) and tournament reports. There is a controversial book Chess master in the fight: Views for the chess of the present (1940), in which some Nazi ideas were represented.[4]

The functionary[edit]

In the post-war period, he also worked considerably at the reestablishment of the German chess federation - Deutscher Schachbund (DSB). Brinckmann was a secretary of the DSB (1950–1967), and an arbiter (1962–1967). He was awarded the Golden honour needle of the German Chess Federation in 1966.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Name Index to Jeremy Gaige's Chess Tournament Crosstables An Electronic Edition, Anders Thulin, Malmö, 2004-09-01
  2. ^ Chess Notes by Edward Winter
  3. ^ Roger Paige's site
  4. ^ Edmund Bruns: Das Schachspiel als Phänomen der Kulturgeschichte des 19. und 20. Jahrhunderts. Lit-Verlag, Münster 2003. ISBN 3-8258-6546-0.

External links[edit]