Alfred Elwes

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Alfred Elwes
Alfred elwes.jpg
Alfred Elwes.
Born 1819
Woolwich, Kent, England
Died 7 December 1888
Kensington, London, England
Occupation writer and philologist
Nationality United Kingdom
Period 1845–1888

Alfred Elwes (1819–1888) was a nineteenth-century British author of children's literature, academic, philologist, and occasional translator of French, Italian and Portuguese literature into English. He is perhaps best remembered for his translation of the medieval Arthurian romance Jaufry the Knight and the Fair Brunissende; a Tale of the Times of King Arthur.

Life and career[edit]

Elwes was born in 1819 at Woolwich, Kent.[1] In his education Elwes attained the degree of Doctor of Philosophy.[2] He studied at Leiden in the Netherlands.[1]

Subsequently Elwes was Professor of English at Leghorn, Tuscany.[1] His earliest known work, Il Nuovo Vergani (1845), a grammar in Italian for the study of English,[1] was probably written and published during his tenure in this position, as was, no doubt, his earliest known translation, A new and complete Italian grammar by Vergani (1846), which would have performed the same office in English for the study of Italian.

Later, after returning to England, Elwes served as President of the British Literary Society in a term beginning in 1857[3] and running through 1858.[4][5] In 1868 he served, along with Samuel Neil, as one of the two vice-presidents of the newly established British Literary Union.[6] In 1870 he held the position of Official Translator of Modern Languages in London.[1]

He died in December 1888 in Kensington.[7]

Literary works[edit]

Elwes' interests in Continental languages and travel are reflected in most of his works. He both wrote and translated travel literature, and much of his children's fiction details the lives or adventures of young protagonists in European locales.

In addition to his works published in book form, Elwes contributed prose and verse to various periodicals.[1]

Elwes was the compiler of a number of English/Romance dictionaries, as well as Romance language grammars for the use of students learning the languages, all reissued in various editions into the twentieth century.

Bibliography[edit]

Juvenile fiction[edit]

Animal stories[edit]

Other[edit]

  • Giulio Branchi: the Story of a Tuscan, related by Himself (1857)
  • Paul Blake, or, The Story of a Boy's Perils in the Islands of Corsica and Monte-Christo (1858) (Google e-text)
  • Frank and Andrea, or, Forest life in the Island of Sardinia (1859)
  • Ralph Seabrooke, or, The Adventures of a Young Artist in Piedmont and Tuscany (1860)
  • Guy Rivers, or, A Boy's Struggles in the Great World (1861) (Google e-text)
  • Luke Ashleigh; or, School-life in Holland (1863)
  • Minna Raymond; a tale that might have been true (1864) (Google e-text)
  • The Legend of the Mount; or, The Days of Chivalry (1866)
  • Swift and Sure; or, The Career of Two Brothers (1872) (Google e-text)
  • Perils Afloat and Brigands Ashore (1886) (Google e-text)

Nonfiction[edit]

History[edit]

  • Ocean and her Rulers; a Narrative of the Nations which have from the Earliest Ages held Dominion over the Sea, comprising a Brief History of Navigation, from the Remotest Periods up to the Present Time (1853) (Google e-text)

Travel[edit]

Philological reference works[edit]

  • Il Nuovo Vergani [a grammar in Italian for the study of English] (1845)
  • A grammar of the Italian language (1852) (Google e-text)
  • A grammar of the Spanish language, in a simple and practical form (1852) (Google e-text)
  • Dictionnaire français-anglais: French-English dictionary (1852) (Google e-text)
  • Dizionario italiano, inglese, francese; A concise dictionary of the Italian, English, & French languages (1853)
  • A dictionary of the Spanish and English and English and Spanish languages (1854)
  • Mr. Henry's Spanish Course (edited, 1866)
  • A grammar of the Portuguese language in a simple and practical form (1876) (Google e-text)
  • A dictionary of the Portuguese language (1876)
  • A triglot dictionary of the Italian, English, and French languages as written and spoken (1879)
  • A dictionary of the Portuguese language in two parts (1888)
  • A dictionary of the Spanish language in two parts (1888) (Google e-text)

Translated works[edit]

Short pieces[edit]

  • "Introductory Remarks," May 1859, in A Sketch of the Comparative Beauties of the French and Spanish Languages, by Manuel Martinez de Morentin, London, Trübner & Co., 1859, pp. [iii]-viii.
  • "To the Members of the British Literary Union" (address), 19 March 1868, in The Quarterly Journal of the British Literary Union, Preliminary Number, April 1868, pp. 11–12.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Allibone, S. Austin. A Critical Dictionary of English Literature and British and American Authors Living and Deceased, from the Earliest Accounts to the Latter Half of the Nineteenth Century. London, Trübner & Co., 1871, vol. III, p. 2781 (a digression under the entry for Joseph Wilson).
  2. ^ Kirk, John Foster (1891). A Supplement to Allibone's Critical Dictionary of English Literature and British and American Authors. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott Company. p. 555. 
  3. ^ The British Controversialist, and Literary Magazine, n.s., v. 5, 1858, London, Houlston and Wright, 1858, p. 279.
  4. ^ The British Controversialist, and Literary Magazine, n.s., v. 6, 1858, London, Houlston and Wright, 1858, p. 192.
  5. ^ The Literary and Education Year Book for 1859, London, Kent and Co., [1858], p. 274.
  6. ^ The Quarterly Journal of the British Literary Union, Preliminary Number, April 1868, London, Longmans, Green, & Co., p. [34].
  7. ^ "Kensington Vol.1a p.109". Death Certificate Index. FreeBMD. Retrieved 28 May 2013.