Alfred Fuller

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For the British anthropologist, see A. W. F. Fuller.
Alfred Fuller
Born Alfred Carl Fuller
(1885-01-13)January 13, 1885
Welsford, Kings County, Nova Scotia
Died December 4, 1973(1973-12-04) (aged 88)
Hartford, Connecticut
Resting place
Pleasant Valley Cemetery in Somerset, Nova Scotia,
Known for Founder of Fuller Brush Company

Alfred Carl Fuller (January 13, 1885 – December 4, 1973) was a Canadian-born American businessman. He was the original "Fuller Brush Man."

Fuller was born on an Annapolis Valley farm in Welsford, Kings County, Nova Scotia. He moved to Boston, Massachusetts in 1903 at the age of 18 to live with his sister. He went to work for the Somerville Brush and Mop Company, and became a successful salesman for them.[1] In 1906, with a $75.00 investment, he started the Fuller Brush Company in Hartford, Connecticut, selling brushes door to door. By 1919, the company had achieved sales of more than $1 million per year.

Fuller Brush went on to be recognized throughout North America, even inspiring two comedy films, The Fuller Brush Man (1948) and The Fuller Brush Girl (1950). In 1961 Fuller recorded the secrets to his success on Folkways Records on an album entitled, Careers in Selling: An Interview with Alfred C. Fuller.[citation needed] The company remained in the Fuller family’s hands until 1968, when it was acquired by Sara Lee Corporation.[2]

Personal life[edit]

Fuller divorced his wife Evelyn in 1930.[3] Fuller maintained a lifelong connection with his native Nova Scotia, buying a home in Yarmouth, where he and his family spent most summers.[citation needed]. In 1996, his widow (who had been born in Yarmouth) donated the house, at 20 Collins Street, to the Yarmouth County Historical Society.[4]

Fuller was a major supporter of what is now The Hartt School, University of Hartford. The Fuller Center was built in 1963 on the college campus.

Fuller died in Hartford, Connecticut and is buried at Pleasant Valley Cemetery in Somerset, Nova Scotia.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Daniel H. Pink, "To Sell Is Human: The Surprising Truth About Moving Others," Riverhead, 2012, pp 11-13
  2. ^ Berg, Eric N. (May 18, 1989). "Fuller Brush Tries New Approach". The New York Times. Retrieved 2011-06-05. 
  3. ^ "Milestones". Time. November 24, 1930. Retrieved 2011-06-05. 
  4. ^ "Pelton-Fuller House," http://yarmouthcountymuseum.ednet.ns.ca/pelton.html
  5. ^ Nova Scotia's Electric Scrapbook: Alfred Carl Fuller Memorial from ns1763.ca

External links[edit]