Alfred Slote

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Alfred Slote
Born (1926-09-11) September 11, 1926 (age 87)
Brooklyn, New York City, New York, United States
Nationality American
Period 1953–present
Genres Children's literature

Alfred Slote (born September 11, 1926)[1] is a children's author known for his numerous sports and space novels. His writing has been described as "making space travel seem as ordinary as piling in the family wagon for a jaunt to McDonald's".[2] Slote's 1991 novel Finding Buck McHenry was adapted into a 2000 television film. He currently resides in Ann Arbor, Michigan. In 2012 Slote and his baseball book Jake were the subject of an ESPN 30 for 30 short documentary in which Slote describes his writing process and reads from the book, saying it is his best writing.[3]


Works[edit]

  • Denham Proper (1953)
  • Lazarus in Vienna (1956)
  • The Princess Who Wouldn't Talk (1964)
  • Strangers and Comrades (1964)
  • The Moon in Fact and Fancy (1967)
  • Air in Fact and Fancy' (1968)
  • Termination; the closing at Baker plant (1969)
  • Stranger on the Ball Club (1970)
  • Jake (1971)
  • The Biggest Victory (1972)
  • My Father, the Coach (1972)
  • Hang Tough, Paul Mather (1973)
  • Tony and Me (1974)
  • Matt Gargan's Boy (1975)
  • The Hotshot (1977)
  • Love and Tenni (1979)
  • The Devil Rides With Me and Other Fantastic Stories (1980)
  • Clone Catcher (1982)
  • Rabbit Ears (1982)
  • A Friend Like That (1988)
  • Moving In (1988)
  • Make-Believe Ball Player (1989)
  • The Trading Game (1990)
  • Finding Buck McHenry (1991)

Robot Buddy series[edit]

  • My Robot Buddy (1975)
  • My trip to Alpha I (1978)
  • C.O.L.A.R. : a tale of outer space (1981)
  • Omega Station (1983)
  • The Trouble on Janus (1985)

Slote's five book series shows the life of Jack Jameson and his robot buddy Danny One as they have adventures in a future society that has developed androids that mimic human beings perfectly and has space transportation via cryonics.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "On This Day in History: September 11, Popular Writer of Books for Children". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. 2007-09-11. Retrieved 2013-05-14. 
  2. ^ Hamilton, Virginia (1981-04-26). "Fanciful Worlds". The New York Times. Retrieved 2007-10-08. 
  3. ^ "30 for 30 Short: Jake". Grantland.com. October 25, 2012. Retrieved July 14, 2013. 

External links[edit]