Alfredo Beltrán Leyva

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Alfredo Beltrán Leyva
Alfredo BELTRAN LEYVA.jpg
Alfredo Beltran Leyva
Born (1971-01-21) January 21, 1971 (age 43)
Badiraguato, Sinaloa, Mexico
Other names "El Mochomo", "El Aguila"
Occupation Leader of Beltrán-Leyva Cartel
Criminal status
Incarcerated

Alfredo Beltrán Leyva (born January 21, 1971[1] in Badiraguato, Sinaloa, Mexico) "whose nickname 'El Mochomo' refers to a desert ant"[2] is an incarcerated Mexican drug lord from the Beltrán-Leyva Cartel.

Break away from the Sinaloa Cartel[edit]

The cartel was created by the four Beltrán Leyva brothers: Héctor, Carlos and Arturo.[3] Born in the Sinaloan countryside in the early 1970s, Alfredo and his brothers worked closely with Joaquín "El Chapo" Guzmán Loera, the leader of the Sinaloa Cartel, during decades of smuggling.[4]

The organization, run mainly by Alfredo, Arturo and Héctor,[5] formed as a splinter group of the powerful Sinaloa Cartel, which was led by Joaquín "El Chapo" Guzmán Loera. After Alfredo was arrested, the Beltrán-Leyva brothers blamed Guzmán Loera and retaliated by forming the Beltrán-Leyva Cartel, and killing one of the Sinaloa cartel chief's sons in a grenade attack on a Culiacán shopping center. This sparked a war between the Sinaloa Cartel and the Beltrán-Leyva Cartel, which allied itself with Los Zetas.[3]

Warrant and arrest[edit]

Alfredo Beltrán Leyva was arrested in Culiacán with three members of his security detail on January 21, 2008, with two suitcases filled with $900,000 in cash and luxury watches.[6][7] Police also found 20 fragmentation grenades, automatic weapons, rifles, 40 bulletproof vests, eight of which bore the initials FEDA, which was likely a Spanish acronym for "Arturo's Special Forces." Authorities also found an unspecified amount of cash in one of his homes. At the time of his arrest, Alfredo was the top lieutenant of Joaquín "Chapo" Guzmán Loera.[8][9] Édgar Eusebio Millán Gómez, top commander of Mexico's national federal police and Spokesman for the Arrest would be assassinated five months later.[10][11]

Kingpin Act sanction[edit]

On 3 December 2009, the United States Department of the Treasury sanctioned Beltrán Leyva under the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act (sometimes referred to simply as the "Kingpin Act"), for his involvement in drug trafficking along with twenty-one other international criminals and ten foreign entities.[12] The act prohibited U.S. citizens and companies from doing any king of business activity with him, and virtually froze all his assets in the U.S.[13]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "BELTRAN LEYVA ORGANIZATION TIER II DESIGNATIONS". United States Department of the Treasury. Archived from the original on 11 November 2012. Retrieved 11 November 2012. 
  2. ^ Castillo, E. Eduardo (22 January 2008). "Key lieutenant to boss of drug cartel caught". The Seattle Times. Associated Press. Archived from the original on 11 November 2012. Retrieved 11 November 2012. 
  3. ^ a b "Mexico captures drug lord Carlos Beltran Leyva". Latin American Herald Tribune (Mexico City). 3 January 2010. Archived from the original on 11 November 2012. 
  4. ^ Grillo, Ioan (7 April 2009). "Meet the drug lords". GlobalPost. Archived from the original on 11 November 2012. Retrieved 11 November 2012. 
  5. ^ De la Luz González, María (4 January 2010). "Héctor Beltrán asume el mando del cártel: PF". El Universal (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 11 November 2012. Retrieved 11 November 2012. 
  6. ^ "Top cocaine smuggler nabbed, Mexico says". CNN (Mexico City). 21 January 2009. Archived from the original on 11 November 2012. Retrieved 11 November 2012. 
  7. ^ Iliff, Laurence (22 January 2008). "Mexican soldiers capture top player in drug cartel". The Dallas Morning News. Archived from the original on 11 November 2012. Retrieved 11 November 2012. 
  8. ^ "Mexico raids net alleged drug cartel figures". Associated Press (MSNBC). 22 January 2008. Archived from the original on 11 November 2012. Retrieved 3 March 2014. 
  9. ^ "Mexico arrests top drugs suspect". BBC News. 21 January 2008. Archived from the original on 11 November 2012. Retrieved 11 November 2012. 
  10. ^ Tobar, Hector (9 May 2008). "Ranking security official slain in Mexico". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on 11 November 2012. Retrieved 11 November 2012. 
  11. ^ McKinley, James C. (9 May 2008). "Gunmen Kill Chief of Mexico’s Police". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 11 November 2012. Retrieved 11 November 2012. 
  12. ^ "DESIGNATIONS PURSUANT TO THE FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN DESIGNATION ACT". United States Department of the Treasury. 15 May 2014. p. 9. Archived from the original on 28 May 2014. Retrieved 28 May 2014. 
  13. ^ "An overview of the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act". United States Department of the Treasury. 2009. p. 1. Archived from the original on 28 May 2014. Retrieved 28 May 2014.