Ali Aref Bourhan

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Ali Aref Bourhan
علي عارف برهان
Ali Aref Bourhan.jpg
President of the Government Council of the French Territory of the Afars and the Issas
In office
1966–1967
Succeeded by Abdallah Mohamed Kamil
Vice President of the Government Council of French Somaliland
In office
June 1960 – 1966
Succeeded by Abdallah Mohamed Kamil
Personal details
Born 1934
Tadjoura, Djibouti
Political party UNI

Ali Aref Bourhan (Arabic: علي عارف برهان‎) (b. 1934 in Tadjoura, Djibouti) was a Djiboutian politician.

Early years[edit]

Bourhan was born in 1934 in the coastal city of Tadjoura, situated in eastern present-day Djibouti. He hailed from a prominent local Afar family, the Abourbakers.[1][2]

As a young man in the 1950s, Bourhan began his professional career as a teacher. He also ran the town's Afar and Somali youth club.[2]

Political career[edit]

Bourhan entered politics under the aegis of Ibrahim Sultan, the then Sultan of Tadjoura. Through the latter, he was introduced to Mahmoud Harbi, the Vice President of the Government Council of French Somaliland and a former comrade of the Sultan in the French army during the World War II campaign. Bourhan would subsequently serve in the territory's representative council as a Harbist politician, strongly supporting Harbi's independence-oriented platform. In 1958, Harbi disappeared from the local political scene,[2] having been exiled to Cairo by the French authorities.[3] He died in a plane crash two years later under mysterious circumstances.[3][4]

In 1960, with the fall of the ruling Dini administration, Bourhan assumed the seat of Vice President of the Government Council of French Somaliland, representing the UNI party.[1][2] He would hold that position until 1966. In July of the following year, he was elected President of the Government Council of the French Territory of the Afars and the Issas. Bourhan served in that capacity until July 29, 1976, the eve of Djibouti's independence. He was succeeded in office by Abdallah Mohamed Kamil.[1]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Worldstatesmen - DJibouti
  2. ^ a b c d Jacques Foccart et Ali Aref
  3. ^ a b United States Joint Publications Research Service, Translations on Sub-Saharan Africa, Issues 464-492, (1966), p.24.
  4. ^ Barrington, Lowell, After Independence: Making and Protecting the Nation in Postcolonial and Postcommunist States, (University of Michigan Press: 2006), p.115

References[edit]

External links[edit]