Alison Bauld

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Alison Margaret Bauld
Born (1944-05-07) 7 May 1944 (age 70)
Origin Australia
Genres classical music
Occupations composer, author
Notable instruments
piano

Alison Margaret Bauld (born 7 May 1944) is an Australian writer and composer who lives and works in London, England.

Biography[edit]

Bauld was born in Sydney and studied piano with Alexander Sverjensky at the New South Wales Conservatorium of Music.[1] She also studied acting at the National Institute of Dramatic Art and toured as a Shakespearian actress for a year before graduating with a Bachelor of Music degree from the University of Sydney.[2] She continued her education in England through a university scholarship, studying composition with Elisabeth Lutyens and Hans Keller and graduated with a doctorate in composition from the University of York in 1974.[3][4]

After completing her education, Bauld worked as a composer and music teacher. Her works have been performed internationally, and she has received a Gulbenkian Dance Award for composition.[5]

Works[edit]

Selected works include:

  • Van Diemen's land, choral fantasy for mezzo soprano, bass, 2 tenors, baritones, male speaker and a capella chorus
  • Dear Emily, music theatre for actress/soprano and harp or piano. Text by William Blake and Alison Bauld
  • Nell, ballad opera
  • Farewell Already, adaptation from Richard III
  • Banquot's Buried, music theatre
  • Where Should Othello Go for tenor/baritone and piano
  • Pluto, theatrical chamber work for soprano, female chorus and instruments
  • No More of Love, song for soprano and piano
  • Play Your Way, three volume piano tutor
  • Van Diemen's Land for a cappella choir[5]

Bauld has also published a novel:

  • Mozart's Sister (Autumn 2005) Alcina Press

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sadie, Julie Anne; Samuel, Rhian (1994). The Norton/Grove dictionary of women composers (Digitized online by GoogleBooks). Retrieved 23 January 2011. 
  2. ^ Pendle, Karin (1991). Women & music: a history. 
  3. ^ "Alison Bauld (b. 1944)". Retrieved 23 January 2011. 
  4. ^ Lebrecht, Norman (1996). The companion to 20th-century music. 
  5. ^ a b "Alison Bauld:Represented Artist". Retrieved 23 January 2011.