Alison Sealy-Smith

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Alison Sealy-Smith
Born 1959
Barbados

Alison Sealy-Smith (born 1959[1]) is a Barbadian actress, born and raised in Barbados.[2]

Sealy-Smith attended Mount Allison University (New Brunswick, Canada) where she studied psychology[1] on a scholarship.[citation needed] She is the founding director of Obsidian Theatre, a company that specializes in Black Canadian drama.[1] Sealy-Smith was awarded a Dora Mavor Moore Award for her 1997 star turn in Djanet Sears' Harlem Duet. Her film and television credits have included the series Street Legal, This is Wonderland and The Line, and a recurring role in Kevin Hill. She also had a small role in the 1998 film My Date with the President's Daughter.

Sealy-Smith also provided voices in various cartoons such as Storm on the 1990s X-Men and Scarlett on the cartoon Delilah and Julius. She also played Sergeant Rose in the film Confessions of a Teenage Drama Queen opposite Lindsay Lohan. She has also appeared in many Hollywood films, including Honey opposite Jessica Alba, Dark Water with Jennifer Connelly and Talk to Me with Don Cheadle. As of the mid-2000s, she has a recurring role as Ms. Mann in the children's series Naturally, Sadie. In 2009, she performed as Nurse Lydia in the HBO Canada series Bloodletting & Miraculous Cures.

Her daughter Makyla Smith is also an actress.[3]

Awards[edit]

Sealy-Smith won a Dora Mavor Moore Award in 1997 for Best Female Performance for her role in Harlem Duet.[4] She also won a Dora Mavor Moore Award in 2009 for Outstanding Performance By A Female In A Principal Role with her role as Lena in A Raisin In The Sun.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Hannon, Gerald (February 2007). "Close to Home". Toronto Life. Archived from the original on 2009-12-09. Retrieved 9 December 2009. 
  2. ^ Hood, Sarah. "Drama for a Diasporic People". Word Magazine. Archived from the original on 2009-12-09. Retrieved 9 December 2009. 
  3. ^ "Go behind the scenes of Color Me Dark: The Story of Nellie Lee Love, Chicago, 1919". Dear America. Scholastic. Archived from the original on 2009-12-09. Retrieved 9 December 2009. 
  4. ^ "Harlem Duet". Canadian Adaptations of Shakespeare Project. Daniel Fischlin. Archived from the original on 2009-12-09. Retrieved 9 December 2009. 
  5. ^ "Toronto salutes theatre icon". Nation News (Nation Publishing Company). 2009-07-26. Archived from the original on 2009-12-09. Retrieved 9 December 2009. 

External links[edit]