Limited Collectors' Edition (comics)

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For the Glen Campbell compilation album, see Limited Collector's Edition.
Limited Collectors' Edition
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Publication information
Publisher DC Comics
Format Ongoing series
Genre
Publication date 1972 – 1978
Number of issues Limited Collectors' Edition: 32
Famous First Edition: 9
All-New Collectors' Edition: 7
Creative team
Writer(s)
Penciller(s)
Inker(s)

Limited Collectors' Edition is an American comic book series published by DC Comics from 1972 to 1978. It usually featured reprints of previously published stories but a few issues contained new material. The series was published in an oversized 10" x 14" tabloid (or "treasury") format.

Publication history[edit]

Limited Collectors' Edition was launched with a collection of Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer stories which went on sale October 24, 1972. DC Comics vice president Sol Harrison had suggested the format stating that "We could create a tabloid size comic that would stand out on the newsstand."[1] Limited Collectors' Edition shared its numbering with two other treasury format series, Famous First Edition[2] and All-New Collectors' Edition.[3] The final issues of the latter two series were tie-ins to the release of Superman: The Movie. DC later published treasuries as part of DC Special Series in 1981 and as a number of one-shots from 1999 to 2003 primarily produced by Paul Dini and Alex Ross.

The issues[edit]

Issue Date Title Notes
C-20 Christmas 1972 "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" Reprints stories from Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer #2, 4-7.[4][5]
C-21 Summer 1973 "Shazam!" Reprints stories from Captain Marvel Adventures #19, 68,115, 121; Captain Marvel, Jr. #11; and Marvel Family #85.[6]
C-22 Fall 1973 "Tarzan" Reprints stories from Tarzan #207-210.[7]
C-23 Winter 1973 "House of Mystery" Reprints stories from House of Mystery #175, 179-180, 182, 186, and 202.[8]
C-24 1973 "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" Reprints stories from Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer #3, 5, and 8 and Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer Annual #13.[4][9]
C-25 1974 "Batman" Reprints stories from Batman #4, 14, 24, and 221 and Detective Comics #355 and 404.[10]
C-27 1974 "Shazam!" Reprints stories from Captain Marvel Adventures #25, 53, 121, 127; Captain Marvel, Jr. #54; and Marvel Family #2, 20-21, and 82.[11]
C-29 1974 "Tarzan" Reprints stories fromTarzan #219-223.[12]
C-31 October–November 1974 "Superman" Reprints stories from Action Comics #22, 29; Superman #60, 142, 204' and Amazing World of Superman, Metropolis Edition. Cover art by H. J. Ward[13] reproduced from a photograph of the original painting.[14]
C-32 December 1974-January 1975 "Ghosts" Reprints stories from Ghosts #1, 3-6. New material by writer Leo Dorfman and artists Gerry Talaoc, E.R. Cruz, and Frank Redondo.[15]
C-33 February–March 1975 "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" Reprints story from Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer #9. New story by writer/penciler Sheldon Mayer and inker Tenny Henson.[4][16]
C-34 February–March 1975 "Christmas with the Super-Heroes" Reprints stories from Batman #239; Captain Marvel Adventures #69; Teen Titans #13; and Action Comics #117. Previously unpublished "Angel and the Ape" story by writer John Albano and artists Bob Oksner and Wally Wood.[17]
C-35 April–May 1975 "Shazam!" Reprints stories from Captain Marvel Adventures #100, 129, 148 and Marvel Family #17. Photo cover features Jackson Bostwick from the Shazam! television series.[18]
C-36 June–July 1975 "The Bible" New material adapting stories from the Book of Genesis by writer Sheldon Mayer and artist Nestor Redondo.[19][20]
C-37 August–September 1975 "Batman" Reprints stories from Batman #8, 43, 45; World's Finest Comics #3; and the Batman comic strip.[21]
C-38 October–November 1975 "Superman" Reprints stories from Superman #40, 48, 157 and Action Comics #315-316.[22]
C-39 October–November 1975 "Secret Origins Super-Villains" Reprints stories from Detective Comics #168; Adventure Comics #271; Showcase #8; Whiz Comics #15; and Superman #249.[23]
C-40 December 1975-January 1976 "Dick Tracy" Reprints the Dick Tracy comic strip from December 21, 1943 to May 17, 1944.[24]
C-41 December 1975-January 1976 "Super Friends" Reprints stories from Justice League of America #36 and 61. New framing sequence by writer E. Nelson Bridwell and artist Alex Toth.[25][26]
C-42 February–March 1976 "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" New stories by writer/penciler Sheldon Mayer and inker Tenny Henson.[4][27]
C-43 February–March 1976 "Christmas with the Super-Heroes" Reprints stories from Superman's Christmas Adventure #1; Batman #219; House of Mystery #191; Sensation Comics #14; and Adventure Comics #82.[28]
C-44 June–July 1976 "Batman" Reprints stories from Detective Comics #329 and 397 and Batman #31 and 83. Cover art by Wally Fax.[29]
C-45 June–July 1976 "More Secret Origins Super-Villains" Reprints stories from Batman #62; The Flash #105; Superboy #78; and Wonder Woman #6.[30]
C-46 August–September 1976 "Justice League of America" Reprints stories from Justice League of America #24 and 34.[31]
C-47 August–September 1976 "Superman Salutes the Bicentennial" Reprints Tomahawk stories from Star Spangled Comics #121, 126-127; More Fun Comics #70; and Tomahawk #45.[32]
C-48 1976 "Superman vs. the Flash" Reprints stories from Superman #199 and The Flash #175. Six page new feature on Superman's Fortress of Solitude by Neal Adams.[33]
C-49 October–November 1976 "Superboy and the Legion of Super-Heroes" Reprints stories from Adventure Comics #369-370.[34]
C-50 Christmas 1976 "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" New stories by writer/penciler Sheldon Mayer and inker Tenny Henson.[4][35]
C-51 August 1977 "Batman" Reprints stories from Batman #232 and 242-244.[36]
C-52 1977 "The Best of DC" Reprints stories from Batman #237; House of Mystery #201; The Flash #148; Our Army at War #241; Tomahawk #136; and Superman #156.[37]
C-57 1978 "Welcome Back, Kotter" Reprints stories from Welcome Back, Kotter #1, 3, and 4. New story by writer Mark Evanier and artists Ric Estrada and Bob Oksner.[38]
C-59 1978 "Batman's Strangest Cases" Reprints stories from The Brave and the Bold #93; Swamp Thing #7; Batman #227 and 250; and Detective Comics #410.[39]

Several planned features for Limited Collectors' Edition were never published. These include several projects by writer/artist Sheldon Mayer. Mayer had been working on an adaptation of The Wizard of Oz but DC's then-Publisher Carmine Infantino canceled the project upon learning of a similar adaptation by Marvel Comics. The two companies published the project jointly and the adaptation was crafted by Marvel's Roy Thomas and John Buscema instead. Mayer also worked on a followup to The Bible issue of Limited Collectors' Edition titled "The Story of Jesus" as well as "Rudolph's Easter Parade" an Easter-themed Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer issue. Neither project was published. "The Legend of King Arthur" by writer Gerry Conway and artist Nestor Redondo was a four issue storyline which was advertised as "Coming Soon" in DC comic books dated September 1975 but the series was never published.[40] A second volume of "The Best of DC" would have included stories reprinted from The Brave and the Bold #42; All-Star Western #11; Superman #247; and Green Lantern #75 but was canceled as part of the DC Implosion.[41]

Famous First Edition[edit]

Issue Date Title Notes
C-26 1974 "Action Comics #1" Exact reprint of Action Comics #1 (June 1938).[42]
C-28 1974 "Detective Comics #27" Exact reprint of Detective Comics #27 (May 1939).[43]
C-30 1974 "Sensation Comics #1" Exact reprint of Sensation Comics #1 (January 1942).[44]
F-4 October–November 1974 "Whiz Comics #2" Exact reprint of Whiz Comics #2 (February 1940).[45]
F-5 February–March 1975 "Batman #1" Exact reprint of Batman #1 (Spring 1940).[46]
F-6 April–May 1975 "Wonder Woman #1" Exact reprint of Wonder Woman #1 (Summer 1942).[47]
F-7 June–July 1975 "All Star Comics #3" Exact reprint of All Star Comics #3 (Winter 1940-1941)[48]
F-8 August–September 1975 "Flash Comics #1" Exact reprint of Flash Comics #1 (January 1940.[49]
C-61 March 1979 "Superman #1" Exact reprint of Superman #1 (Summer 1939).[50]

Famous First Edition was a series of oversized reprints of original Golden Age comics. All but two (#F-7, All-Star Comics #3 and #F-8, Flash Comics #1) included full-size cover-stock reprints of the front and back covers in addition to the usual cardboard-like cover stock. Famous First Edition reprinted the comics in their entirety, including any paid advertising and other features that appeared in the original.

All-New Collectors' Edition[edit]

Issue Date Title Notes
C-53 January 1978 "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" New stories by writer/penciler Sheldon Mayer and inker Tenny Henson.[4][51]
C-54 1978 "Superman vs. Wonder Woman" New story by writer Gerry Conway and artists José Luis García-López and Dan Adkins.[52][53]
C-55 1978 "Superboy and the Legion of Super-Heroes " New story by writer Paul Levitz and artists Mike Grell and Vince Colletta featuring the wedding of Saturn Girl and Lightning Lad.[54][55][56]
C-56 1978 "Superman vs. Muhammad Ali" New story by Dennis O'Neil which was adapted and penciled by Neal Adams with figure inks by Dick Giordano and background inks by Terry Austin.[57][58][59]
C-58 April 1978 "Superman vs. Shazam!" New story by writer Gerry Conway and artists Rich Buckler and Dick Giordano.[60][61]
C-60 1978 "Rudolph's Summer Fun" New Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer stories by writer/penciler Sheldon Mayer and inker Tenny Henson.[4][62]
C-62 1979 "Superman: The Movie" Photos and background material from the film.[63][64][65]

Three features originally intended for All-New Collectors' Edition were published elsewhere due to the title's cancellation as part of the DC Implosion. "Superman's Life Story" by Martin Pasko and Curt Swan was published in Action Comics #500 (October 1979). The planned 1978 Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer tabloid's material appeared in The Best of DC #4 (March–April 1980).[66] A Justice League story by Gerry Conway and Rich Buckler saw print in Justice League of America #210-212 (January 1983-March 1983).[67][68][69]

DC Special Series[edit]

Issue Date Title Notes
25 Summer 1981 "Superman II" Photos and background material from the film.[63][70]
26 Summer 1981 "Superman and His Incredible Fortress of Solitude" "Secrets of Superman's Fortress" by Roy Thomas, Ross Andru, and Romeo Tanghal.[63][71]
27 Fall 1981 Batman vs. the Incredible Hulk DC-Marvel crossover by Len Wein, José Luis García-López, and Dick Giordano.[72][73][74]

Other DC treasuries[edit]

Collected editions[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wells, John (December 2012). "The Perils of the DC/Marvel Tabloid Era". Back Issue (TwoMorrows Publishing) (61): 1. 
  2. ^ Wells in Back Issue p. 2: "Running parallel to Limited Collectors' Edition was another trailblazing tabloid...Famous First Edition provided exact replicas of key Golden Age DC issues."
  3. ^ Wells in Back Issue p. 6: "The series was renamed All-New Collectors' Edition with issue #C-53's Rudolph volume and shifted toward newly commissioned adventures."
  4. ^ a b c d e f g Arnold, Mark (December 2012). "You Know Dasher and Dancer: Rudolph The Red-Nosed Reindeer". Back Issue (TwoMorrows Publishing) (61): 7–10. 
  5. ^ Limited Collectors' Edition #C-20 at the Grand Comics Database
  6. ^ Limited Collectors' Edition #C-21 at the Grand Comics Database
  7. ^ Limited Collectors' Edition #C-22 at the Grand Comics Database
  8. ^ Limited Collectors' Edition #C-23 at the Grand Comics Database
  9. ^ Limited Collectors' Edition #C-24 at the Grand Comics Database
  10. ^ Limited Collectors' Edition #C-25 at the Grand Comics Database
  11. ^ Limited Collectors' Edition #C-27 at the Grand Comics Database
  12. ^ Limited Collectors' Edition #C-29 at the Grand Comics Database
  13. ^ Limited Collectors' Edition #C-31 at the Grand Comics Database
  14. ^ Barron, James (April 18, 2010). "The Mystery of the Missing Man of Steel". The New York Times. Archived from the original on July 19, 2013. Retrieved July 19, 2013. "The painting disappeared after [Harry] Donenfeld retired in 1957. All that remained...was a single color snapshot...that photograph had served as the basis for a cover of a 'limited collector’s edition Superman comic' in the mid-1970s." 
  15. ^ Limited Collectors' Edition #C-32 at the Grand Comics Database
  16. ^ Limited Collectors' Edition #C-33 at the Grand Comics Database
  17. ^ Limited Collectors' Edition #C-34 at the Grand Comics Database
  18. ^ Limited Collectors' Edition #C-35 at the Grand Comics Database
  19. ^ Zeno, Eddy (December 2012). "DC Comics' The Bible". Back Issue (TwoMorrows Publishing) (61): 17–23. 
  20. ^ Limited Collectors' Edition #C-36 at the Grand Comics Database
  21. ^ Limited Collectors' Edition #C-37 at the Grand Comics Database
  22. ^ Limited Collectors' Edition #C-38 at the Grand Comics Database
  23. ^ Limited Collectors' Edition #C-39 at the Grand Comics Database
  24. ^ Limited Collectors' Edition #C-40 at the Grand Comics Database
  25. ^ Franklin, Chris (December 2012). "The Kids in the Hall (of Justice) A Whirlwind Tour with the Super Friends". Back Issue (TwoMorrows Publishing) (61): 24–28. 
  26. ^ Limited Collectors' Edition #C-41 at the Grand Comics Database
  27. ^ Limited Collectors' Edition #C-42 at the Grand Comics Database
  28. ^ Limited Collectors' Edition #C-43 at the Grand Comics Database
  29. ^ Limited Collectors' Edition #C-44 at the Grand Comics Database
  30. ^ Limited Collectors' Edition #C-45 at the Grand Comics Database
  31. ^ Limited Collectors' Edition #C-46 at the Grand Comics Database
  32. ^ Limited Collectors' Edition #C-47 at the Grand Comics Database
  33. ^ Limited Collectors' Edition #C-48 at the Grand Comics Database
  34. ^ Limited Collectors' Edition #C-49 at the Grand Comics Database
  35. ^ Limited Collectors' Edition #C-50 at the Grand Comics Database
  36. ^ Limited Collectors' Edition #C-51 at the Grand Comics Database
  37. ^ Limited Collectors' Edition #C-52 at the Grand Comics Database
  38. ^ Limited Collectors' Edition #C-57 at the Grand Comics Database
  39. ^ Limited Collectors' Edition #C-59 at the Grand Comics Database
  40. ^ Wells, John (October 24, 1997), "'Lost' DC: 1976-1980", Comics Buyer's Guide (1249): 127 
  41. ^ Wells in Back Issue p. 5
  42. ^ Famous First Edition #C-26 at the Grand Comics Database
  43. ^ Famous First Edition #C-28 at the Grand Comics Database
  44. ^ Famous First Edition #C-30 at the Grand Comics Database
  45. ^ Famous First Edition #F-4 at the Grand Comics Database
  46. ^ Famous First Edition #F-5 at the Grand Comics Database
  47. ^ Famous First Edition #F-6 at the Grand Comics Database
  48. ^ Famous First Edition #F-7 at the Grand Comics Database
  49. ^ Famous First Edition #F-8 at the Grand Comics Database
  50. ^ Famous First Edition #C-61 at the Grand Comics Database
  51. ^ All-New Collectors' Edition #C-53 at the Grand Comics Database
  52. ^ Mangels, Andy (December 2012). "Kryptonian and Amazonian Not Living in Perfect Harmony". Back Issue (TwoMorrows Publishing) (61): 50–54. 
  53. ^ All-New Collectors' Edition #C-54 at the Grand Comics Database
  54. ^ Ford, Jim (December 2012). "Superboy and the Legion of Super-Heroes". Back Issue (TwoMorrows Publishing) (61): 55–58. 
  55. ^ McAvennie, Michael; Dolan, Hannah, ed. (2010). "1970s". DC Comics Year By Year A Visual Chronicle. Dorling Kindersley. p. 177. ISBN 978-0-7566-6742-9. "Only an oversized treasury edition could have contained Superboy and the entire Legion of Super-Heroes' battle with the Time Trapper...and the long-awaited wedding of Lightning Lad and Saturn Girl...Legion favorites Paul Levitz and Mike Grell were up to the enormous challenge with the popular tale 'The Millennium Massacre'." 
  56. ^ All-New Collectors' Edition #C-55 at the Grand Comics Database
  57. ^ Weiss, Brett (December 2012). "Superman vs. Muhammad Ali". Back Issue (TwoMorrows Publishing) (61): 59–64. 
  58. ^ McAvennie "1970s" in Dolan, p. 178: "Writer/artist Neal Adams proclaimed that Superman vs. Muhammad Ali was "the best comic book" he and co-writer Denny O'Neil had ever produced."
  59. ^ All-New Collectors' Edition #C-56 at the Grand Comics Database
  60. ^ Hamerlinck, P.C. (December 2012). "When Worlds Collide The Colossal-Sized Confrontation Between Superman and Captain Marvel". Back Issue (TwoMorrows Publishing) (61): 65–68. 
  61. ^ All-New Collectors' Edition #C-58 at the Grand Comics Database
  62. ^ All-New Collectors' Edition #C-60 at the Grand Comics Database
  63. ^ a b c d Eury, Michael (December 2012). "The Amazing World of Superman Tabloids". Back Issue (TwoMorrows Publishing) (61): 11–16. 
  64. ^ McAvennie "1970s" in Dolan, p. 180: "DC went to greater lengths with its tabloid-sized Superman: The Movie magazine than with prior treasury editions. Instead of containing stories and artwork, it approached the material with a greater eye toward graphic design."
  65. ^ All-New Collectors' Edition #C-62 at the Grand Comics Database
  66. ^ The Best of DC #4 at the Grand Comics Database
  67. ^ Justice League of America #210 at the Grand Comics Database
  68. ^ Wells, John (October 24, 1997), "'Lost' DC: The DC Implosion", Comics Buyer's Guide (1249): 132 
  69. ^ Wells in Back Issue p. 6
  70. ^ DC Special Series #25 at the Grand Comics Database
  71. ^ DC Special Series #26 at the Grand Comics Database
  72. ^ a b c Greenberg, Glenn (December 2012). "Tabloid Team-Ups The Giant-Size DC-Marvel Crossovers". Back Issue (TwoMorrows Publishing) (61): 33–40. 
  73. ^ Manning, Matthew K. "1980s" in Dolan, p. 195: "Written by Len Wein and illustrated by José Luis García-López, the comic saw...Batman and the Hulk doing battle with both the Joker and Marvel's ultra-powerful Shaper of Worlds."
  74. ^ DC Special Series #27 at the Grand Comics Database
  75. ^ The Amazing World of Superman, Metropolis Edition at the Grand Comics Database
  76. ^ McAvennie "1970s" in Dolan, p. 165: "The Yellow Brick Road from Munchkin Land to the Emerald City was also wide enough to accommodate DC and Marvel as they produced their first-ever joint publication...Roy Thomas scripted a faithful, seventy-two page adaptation of Dorothy Gale's adventure, while John Buscema's artwork depicted the landscape of Oz in lavish detail."
  77. ^ Abramowitz, Jack (December 2012). "The Secrets of Oz Revealed". Back Issue (TwoMorrows Publishing) (61): 29–32. 
  78. ^ MGM's Marvelous Wizard of Oz #1 at the Grand Comics Database
  79. ^ McAvennie "1970s" in Dolan, p. 170: "The tale was written by Gerry Conway and drawn by Ross Andru, both among the few [at that time] to ever have worked on both Superman and Spider-Man...The result was a defining moment in Bronze Age comics."
  80. ^ Superman vs. The Amazing Spider-Man at the Grand Comics Database
  81. ^ a b c d e f Smith, Zack (December 2012). "Paul Dini & Alex Ross Discuss a Treasured Format". Back Issue (TwoMorrows Publishing) (61): 69–77. "From 1998 to 2003, [Paul Dini and Alex Ross] produced a series of fully painted oversized books featuring DC's biggest heroes." 
  82. ^ Manning "1990s" in Dolan, p. 286: "Alex Ross teamed up with writer Paul Dini...to tell a powerful story of the Man of Steel. In this beautiful sixty-four-page oversized one-shot...Superman fought a battle even he couldn't truly win: the war on poverty and hunger."
  83. ^ Superman: Peace on Earth at the Grand Comics Database
  84. ^ Superman / Fantastic Four at the Grand Comics Database
  85. ^ Manning "1990s" in Dolan, p. 289: "The second in the oversized prestige-format tabloid collaborations between writer Paul Dini and painter Alex Ross, Batman: War on Crime was just as successful as its predecessor, and just as beautiful."
  86. ^ Batman: War on Crime at the Grand Comics Database
  87. ^ Cowsill, Alan "2000s" in Dolan, p. 297: "Artist Bryan Hitch made full use of the book's extra-large format...Written by Mark Waid, Heaven's Ladder dealt with religion and the afterlife."
  88. ^ JLA: Heaven's Ladder at the Grand Comics Database
  89. ^ Shazam! Power of Hope at the Grand Comics Database
  90. ^ Wonder Woman: Spirit of Truth at the Grand Comics Database
  91. ^ JLA: Secret Origins at the Grand Comics Database
  92. ^ JLA: Liberty and Justice at the Grand Comics Database

External links[edit]