All Hyderabad Trade Union Congress

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AHTUC
Full name All Hyderabad Trade Union Congress
Founded 1946
Members 72,000
Country India
Affiliation All India Trade Union Congress
Key people Makhdoom Mohiuddin, president, Raj Bahadur Gour, general secretary

The All Hyderabad Trade Union Congress (AHTUC) was a trade union centre in the Hyderabad State. Affiliated to the All India Trade Union Congress,[1] it claimed a membership of around 72,000.[2] The trade union centre, which was aligned with the Communist Party of India, was one of the organisations that took part in the Telangana Rebellion against the Nizam regime.

Foundation[edit]

The founding of the AHTUC was preceded by a Marathwada Labour Conference held in Aurangabad on November 30, 1945. The conference was organized by unions which were under the leadership of the Communist Party. The conference elected a provisional committee for the formation of a new trade union centre in the Hyderabad State.[3] The founding meeting of the AHTUC was held in Secunderabad on August 16–18, 1946.[1][4] The new union centre was inaugurated by the veteran trade union leader N.M. Joshi, who was the general secretary of the AITUC.[4][5] The founding president Makhdoom Mohiuddin of the AHTUC, who had an arrest warrant against him and lived underground, was arrested immediately after the meeting. He was later released.[6]

Upon its foundation, the new organization affiliated itself with the AITUC.[1] The Singareni Collieries Workers Union, a union organising labourers in the Singareni coal fields, was affiliated itself to the AHTUC.[7]

Leadership[edit]

The Urdu poet Makhdoom Mohiuddin was the founding president of the AHTUC,[8][9] whilst Raj Bahadur Gour was the founding general secretary of the organisation.[4][10] Sayed Makhdoom served as vice president of the AHTUC.[11]

Crackdown[edit]

Soon after the formation of the new trade union centre one of its affiliates, the electricity workers union led by B.S. Madhav Singh, broke away from the AHTUC and instead joined the socialist trade union centre Hind Mazdoor Sabha.[12]

In August 1946, the regime began a crackdown on the AHTUC.[7][13] AHTUC responded by issuing a call to celebrate October 17, 1946 as 'Anti-Repression Day'. This appeal resulted in yet intensified repression on behalf of the Nizam regime. On September 30, 1946 police conducted raids on some 150 houses in Hyderabad, Secunderabad and other areas in Telangana belonging to unions, parties and individual leaders that were taking part in the preparations for the October 17 protests. Large amounts of correspondence of the trade union movement were seized in the raids. Police forces were also deployed in industrial areas to hinder workers from gathering to rally against the actions of the government.[14]

Police raided the Singareni Collieries Workers Union office in Kothagudem on February 12, 1947. Workers rallied to protest the leaders of the union and help them escape. In total, 20 workers were arrested. They were sentenced to six months' imprisonment each. In the coming months the main leaders of the union were captured and jailed, and the union office was shut down.[7]

Resistance struggle[edit]

As the Nizam declared Hyderabad as an independent state in September 1947, Makhdoom Mohiuddin was one of the signatories of a joint declaration of the Communist Party, Andhra Maha Sabha and the AHTUC calling for armed insurrection against the Nizam's rule for the integration of Hyderabad in the Indian Union (Mohiuddin signed on behalf of AHTUC). Armed struggle began in Telangana.[15][16]

In December 1948 the municipal workers union affiliated to AHTUC, led by Amarnath Burman, went on strike.[17]

People's Democratic Front[edit]

In 1950 the AHTUC was one of the founding organizations of the People's Democratic Front.[18]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Bhaskara Rao, V. Agrarian and Industrial Relations in Hyderabad State. New Delhi: Associated Pub. House, 1985. p. 121
  2. ^ The Times of India Directory and Year Book Including Who's Who. Bombay: Bennett, Coleman, 1955. p. 977
  3. ^ Bhaskara Rao, V. Agrarian and Industrial Relations in Hyderabad State. New Delhi: Associated Pub. House, 1985. p. 119
  4. ^ a b c Gour, Raj Bahadur. Random Writings. Hyderabad: Makhdoom Society in collaboration with Prachee Publications, Hyderabad, 2002. p. 5
  5. ^ Immortal Heroes: Lives of Communist Leaders. New Delhi: Communist Party of India, 1975. p. 85
  6. ^ Gour, Raj Bahadur. Random Writings. Hyderabad: Makhdoom Society in collaboration with Prachee Publications, Hyderabad, 2002. p. 182
  7. ^ a b c Ram Reddy, R. Industrial Relations in India: A Study of the Singareni Collieries. New Delhi, India: Mittal Publications, 1990. pp. 122–23
  8. ^ Arora, N.D.. Political Science for Civil Services Main Examination. New Delhi: Tata McGraw Hill, 2010. p. 11
  9. ^ India Partitioned: The Other Face of Freedom. New Delhi: Roli Books, 1995. p. 83
  10. ^ Nehru, Jawaharlal, M. Chalapathi Rau, and Sarvepalli Gopal. Selected Works of Jawaharlal Nehru. Ser. 2. Vol. 18, (April 1 – July 5, 1952). 1996. p. 193
  11. ^ Gour, Raj Bahadur. Glorious Telengana Armed Struggle. New Delhi: New Age printing press, 1973. p. 9
  12. ^ Radhakrishna Sarma, Mukkamala, K. D. Abhyankar, and S. G. Moghe. History of Hyderabad District, 1879–1950 A.D., Yugabda 4981–5052. Hyderabad: Bharatiya Itihasa Sankalana Samiti, 1987. pp. 91–92
  13. ^ Batra, Satish K., and Tej K. Jain. State Enterprises: The Emerging Scenario. Jaipur: Printwell Publishers, 1988. p. 143
  14. ^ Ramakrishna Reddy, V. Economic History of Hyderabad State: Warangal Suba, 1911–1950. Delhi: Gian Pub. House, 1987. p. 535
  15. ^ Mainstream Weekly. Relevance of the Telangana Armed Struggle
  16. ^ New Age. Telangana in Mess, Confusion deepens
  17. ^ Radhakrishna Sarma, Mukkamala, K. D. Abhyankar, and S. G. Moghe. History of Hyderabad District, 1879–1950 A.D., Yugabda 4981–5052. Hyderabad: Bharatiya Itihasa Sankalana Samiti, 1987. p. 93
  18. ^ Binani, G. D., and T. V. Rama Rao. India at a Glance. Bombay [usw.]: Orient Longmans, 1954. p. 127