All Your Love (I Miss Loving)

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"All Your Love" redirects here. For the Siti Nurhaliza album, see All Your Love (album).
"All Your Love (I Miss Loving)"
Single by Otis Rush
B-side "My Baby's a Good 'Un"
Released 1958 (1958)
Format 7" 45 rpm record
Recorded Cobra Studios, Chicago,1958 (1958)
Genre Blues
Length 2:36
Label Cobra (no. 5032)
Writer(s) Otis Rush
Producer(s) Willie Dixon
Otis Rush singles chronology
"Double Trouble"
(1958)
"All Your Love (I Miss Loving)"
(1958)
"So Many Roads So Many Trains"
(1960)

"All Your Love (I Miss Loving)" or "All Your Love"[1] is a blues song written and recorded in 1958 by Chicago blues guitarist Otis Rush. It is "the best-known and most covered of Rush's [authored] songs",[2] with versions recorded by several blues and other artists. It was inspired by an earlier blues song and later influenced other popular songs.

Composition and recording[edit]

"All Your Love" is a moderate-tempo minor-key twelve-bar blues with Afro-Cuban rhythmic influences. An impromptu song "apparently dashed off ... in the car en route to Cobra's West Roosevelt Road studios",[3] it borrows guitar lines and the arrangement from "Lucky Lou", a 1957 instrumental single by blues guitarist Jody Williams (Argo 5274).[4] The song alternates between guitar and vocal sections, with an instrumental bridge performed as a faster-tempo twelve-bar shuffle featuring Rush's guitar solo.

The song was produced by Willie Dixon and features Rush on guitar and vocal, Dixon on bass, Ike Turner on second guitar), Little Brother Montgomery on piano, Harold Ashby and Jackie Brenston on saxophones, and Billy Gayles on drums. When "All Your Love" was released in 1958 on Cobra Records, it was Rush's last single for the label. Rush subsequently recorded several studio and live versions of the song, including one released on his Blues Interaction – Live in Japan 1986 album.

Recognition and influence[edit]

In 2010, Otis Rush's "All Your Love (I Miss Loving)" was inducted into the Blues Foundation Hall of Fame, which noted that Rush's song "was the obvious inspiration for Bob Dylan's recent track "Beyond Here Lies Nothin'"".[5] In various interviews, Peter Green acknowledged being influenced by "All Your Love"' when he wrote the rock classic "Black Magic Woman",[6] which became a major hit for Santana. According to Carlos Santana, "If you take the words from 'Black Magic Woman' and just leave the rhythm, it's 'All Your Love'—it's Otis Rush".[7]

Recordings by other artists[edit]

A variety of musical artists have recorded "All Your Love", including[8] John Mayall and the Bluesbreakers from the album Blues Breakers with Eric Clapton (1966), Aerosmith from Pandora's Box (1977, released 1991), Stevie Ray Vaughan from In the Beginning (1980, released 1992), Gary Moore from Still Got the Blues (1990), and the Steve Miller Band from Bingo! (2010).

References[edit]

  1. ^ Magic Sam wrote and recorded a different "All Your Love" (Cobra 5013) in 1957.
  2. ^ Snowden, Don (1993). The Cobra Records Story (Box set booklet). Various Artists. Capricorn Records. p. 16. 9 42012-2. 
  3. ^ Dahl, Bill (1996). "Otis Rush". In Erlewine, Michael. All Music Guide to the Blues (Miller Freeman Books). p. 229. ISBN 0-87930-424-3. 
  4. ^ Billboard (Nielsen Business Media, Inc): 56. February 16, 2002. ISSN 0006-2510. 
  5. ^ "Classic of Blues Recording – Single or Album Track". Blues Hall of Fame Inductees Winners. The Blues Foundation. 2010. Retrieved July 2, 2014. 
  6. ^ Celmins, Martin (1998). Peter Green: Founder of Fleetwood Mac. Sanctuary Publishing. p. 73. ISBN 1-86074-233-5. 
  7. ^ Aykroyd, Dan; Manilla, Ben (2004). Elwood's Blues: Interviews with the Blues Legends & Stars. Backbeat Books. p. 145. ISBN 978-0-87930-809-4. 
  8. ^ "Song Search Results for All Your Love (I Miss Loving)". AllMusic. Rovi Corp. Retrieved July 2, 2014.