Allameh Tabatabaei University

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Allameh Tabataba'i University
دانشگاه علامه طباطبائی
ATU.svg
Established 1956; 58 years ago (1956)
Type Public
President Hossein Salimi
Academic staff 500
Students 17000
Postgraduates 2300
Location Tehran, Tehran, Iran
Campus 5 Urban Campuses
Website

www.atu.ac.ir/index_en.htm

 

Allameh Tabataba'i University (ATU) (Persian: دانشگاه علامه طباطبائی‎), is a public university in Tehran, Iran, under the supervision of the Ministry of Sciences, Research and Technology. It is the largest specialized state social sciences university in Iran and the Middle East, with 17000 students and 500 full-time faculty members.[1][2] The university is named in honor of Allameh Tabatabaei, a prominent Iranian philosopher.

After its establishment by articulation of 24 independent colleges and faculties in 1983, the university evolved into the country’s most eminent university in humanities and social sciences. Before that, the university was known as "The Advanced School of Commerce" which was initially founded in 1956, before the Islamic Revolution, with academic support from American institutions.

Allameh Tabataba'i University is mainly active in the humanities and economic sciences. It is recognized by the Ministry of Sciences, Research and Technology as the "Scientific Pole" of the country in economic science and the Center of Excellence in "Development Economics".[3][4] The faculty of "Psychology and Education" has also a high reputation and has distinguished the university as the "Scientific Pole in Educational Science".[5]

Allameh Tabataba'i University currently constitutes 7 faculties.


History[edit]

The university was founded in 1956 with academic support from American institutions as The Advanced School of Commerce. In 1984, various institutes of higher education such as the Literature and Humanities University Complex and the Commerce and Administration University Complex and many others were merged to form the present university. The colleges which formed these complexes and now constitute this university are as follows :

  • Management and Accounting Complex : Tehran College of Commerce (1958), College of Banking (1964), Tehran College of Insurance (1970), College of Iran Zamin (1969), Industrial Management Institute (1970), College of Tourism and Information (1972), Center for Public Management (1972), Iran Centre for Management Studies (1971), College of Airpost Training (1974), Advanced School of Accounting and Finance, National Iranian Oil Company (1957), International College of Administrative and Commercial Services (1976).
  • Literature and Humanities Complex : College of Social Services (1958), College of Social Communication (1966), College of Pars (1967), College of Damavand (1969), College of Translation (1969), Research Center for Iranian Culture (1970), College of Political and Social Sciences (1971), Teacher Training College (1973), and College of Shemiran (1973).


In May 2001 the Iran Center for Management Studies was re-established as an independent educational institution.

Faculties[edit]

1. Faculty of Persian Literature and Foreign Languages

2. Faculty of Economics

3. E.C.O College of Insurance

4. Faculty of Law and Political Sciences

5. Faculty of Psychology and Education

6. Faculty of Social Sciences

7. Allameh Tabatabai Management School, also known as Faculty of Management and Accounting

Notable alumni[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Allameh tabatabaei University. "About the University". Archived from the original on 22 July 2011. Retrieved 27 July 2011. 
  2. ^ Institute for Interdisciplinary Cultural Studies, Allameh Tabatabaei University. "Introduction". Retrieved 27 July 2011. 
  3. ^ Roshd Encyclopedya. "School of Economics, Allameh tabatabaei University". Retrieved 27 July 2011. 
  4. ^ "Scientific pole". Allameh Tabatabaei University. Retrieved 27 July 2011. 
  5. ^ "School of Psychology and Education, Allameh Tabatabaei University". Roshd Encyclopedya. Retrieved 27 July 2011. 

External links[edit]