Allan G. Wyon

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"New Birth", by Allan G. Wyon. 1931

The Revd Allan Gairdner Wyon FRBS RMS (1882 - 26 February 1962) was a British die-engraver and sculptor and, in later life, vicar in Newlyn, Cornwall.

Many of his works are memorials with a number located in British cathedrals.[1] Other, more decorative, works include the relief of a male figure representing the East Wind on the London Underground headquarters building at 55 Broadway above St. James's Park Underground Station.[1]

Biography[edit]

Wyon was born in 1882, the son of Allan Wyon FSA (1843–1907) and Harriet Gairdner.[2] Wyon's father, two of his uncles, his grandfather and his great-grandfather successively held the position of Chief Engraver of Seals to the monarch.[2]

Wyon attended Highgate School and, like others in his family, studied sculpture at The Royal Academy Schools where he was an assistant to Hamo Thornycroft.[2] Between 1924 and 1930 he was Honorary Secretary of the Art Workers Guild. He was a Fellow of the Royal Society of British Sculptors and also worked as a die-engraver, but took Holy Orders in 1933. From 1936 until his retirement in 1955, he was vicar of St. Peters Church, Newlyn.[1]

He married Eileen May Trench in 1910; they had one daughter.[1] He had three sisters, Olive, and two others. One an Anglican Deaconess and the other a Congregational Minister.

Works[edit]

Wyon exhibited a wide range of sculptures, busts medals and engravings at the Royal Academy. He designed commemorative and memorial medals for the Masons, the London Chamber of Commerce, and Lloyd's.[1]

Sculptured memorials in Salisbury Cathedral by Wyon include those to:[1]

Other memorials include those to:[1]

Other works:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Obituaries – The Rev. Allan Wyon". The Times (55326): p. 15. 27 February 1962. Retrieved 2009-06-04. 
  2. ^ a b c Attwood, Philip (2004). "Wyon family (per. c.1760–1962), die-engravers and medallists". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/64499. Retrieved 2009-06-04. 
  3. ^ Francis, Peter (2013). Shropshire War Memorials, Sites of Remembrance. YouCaxton Publications. p. 177. ISBN 978-1-909644-11-3. 
  4. ^ Shropshire War Memorials, Sites of Remembrance. pp. 191–192.