Allen Lane (SEPTA station)

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Allen Lane
SEPTA regional rail
AllenLane1.JPG
Allen Lane station during construction of the high-level platforms
Location 200 West Allens Lane
Mount Airy, Philadelphia, PA
Coordinates 40°03′27″N 75°11′42″W / 40.0575°N 75.1950°W / 40.0575; -75.1950Coordinates: 40°03′27″N 75°11′42″W / 40.0575°N 75.1950°W / 40.0575; -75.1950
Owned by SEPTA
Line(s)
Platforms 2 side platforms
Tracks 2
Construction
Parking 6 spaces
Disabled access Yes
Other information
Fare zone 2
History
Opened 1880
Electrified 1918
Services
Preceding station   SEPTA.svg SEPTA   Following station
Chestnut Hill West Line
  Former services  
Pennsylvania Railroad
Chestnut Hill Line
toward White Marsh
Fort Washington Branch Terminus

Allen Lane Station is a SEPTA Regional Rail station at 200 West Allens Lane in the Mount Airy neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. The station stands at the intersection of Allens Lane and Cresheim Road. The station building was built circa 1880, according to the Philadelphia Architects and Buildings project. Like many in Philadelphia, it retains much of its Victorian/Edwardian appearance. The High Point Cafe is in the station building.

The station is in zone 2 on the Chestnut Hill West Line, on former Pennsylvania Railroad tracks, and is 10.1 track miles from Suburban Station. In fiscal 2012, this station saw 307 boardings on an average weekday.

The name: "Allen" vs "Allen’s" vs "Allens"[edit]

Allen Lane station got its name from the adjoining street, Allens Lane, which was named for William Allen, a prominent man of colonial-era Pennsylvania. His estate, Mount Airy (from which the surrounding Mount Airy neighborhood got its name), was at the top of the hill where Allens Lane meets Germantown Avenue. (The site is now the campus of the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia). Since at least the 19th century, there has been variation in the lane's name between "Allen", "Allen’s", and "Allens", in part because its derivation is (understandably) not well known except by locals interested in Philadelphia history. Today, through maps and signage, the names have reached a level of written codification that leaves the lane's name written consistently as "Allens" and the station's name written consistently as "Allen". Colloquially, the Allen/Allen’s/Allens variation persists in local speech, such as when train conductors sometimes announce the stop with the genitive inflection. Interestingly, the non-genitive variation that became the codified station name may have been reinforced by a timetable printer's error—the Pennsylvania Railroad's timetables were printed by the firm of Allen, Lane & Scott.

Restoration and renovation[edit]

The Allen Lane station in October 2012 after construction of the high level platforms.

Allen Lane Station underwent a two-phase restoration and renovation project in the late 1990s and early 2000s. The first phase of work on the historic station building and shelters was completed in September 1999. The second phase, which included the construction of high level platforms, a rebuilt pedestrian overpass, and ramps for handicapped access, was completed in 2011.

External links[edit]

Media related to Allen Lane (SEPTA station) at Wikimedia Commons