Allenstown, New Hampshire

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Allenstown, New Hampshire
Town
Allenstown Municipal Building
Allenstown Municipal Building
Official seal of Allenstown, New Hampshire
Seal
Location in Merrimack County and the state of New Hampshire.
Location in Merrimack County and the state of New Hampshire.
Coordinates: 43°09′28″N 71°24′17″W / 43.15778°N 71.40472°W / 43.15778; -71.40472Coordinates: 43°09′28″N 71°24′17″W / 43.15778°N 71.40472°W / 43.15778; -71.40472
Country United States
State New Hampshire
County Merrimack
Incorporated 1831
Government
 • Board of Selectmen Jason Tardiff, Chair
Jeff Gryval
Kate Walker
Area
 • Total 20.4 sq mi (52.9 km2)
 • Land 20.3 sq mi (52.6 km2)
 • Water 0.1 sq mi (0.3 km2)  0.54%
Elevation 340 ft (104 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 4,322
 • Density 210/sq mi (82/km2)
Time zone Eastern (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (UTC-4)
ZIP code 03275
Area code(s) 603
FIPS code 33-00660
GNIS feature ID 0873528
Website www.allenstown.org

Allenstown is a town in Merrimack County, New Hampshire, United States. The population was 4,322 at the 2010 census.[1] Allenstown includes a portion of the village of Suncook. Just over one-half of the town's area is covered by Bear Brook State Park.

History[edit]

Allenstown takes its name from 17th-century provincial governor Samuel Allen. It was granted in 1721 but not incorporated until 2 July 1831.[2] A part of neighboring Bow was annexed to Allenstown in 1815, and a portion of Hooksett was annexed in 1853.[3][4]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 20.4 square miles (52.8 km2), of which 20.3 square miles (52.6 km2) is land and 0.1 square miles (0.3 km2) is water, comprising 0.54% of the town.[5] The highest point in Allenstown is Bear Hill, at 835 feet (255 m) above sea level. Allenstown lies fully within the Merrimack River watershed.[6]

Bear Brook State Park occupies 6,740 acres (27.3 km2) in the center of town, extending from the town's northern corner to its southern corner. (An additional 3,200 acres (13 km2) of the park are in the neighboring towns of Deerfield, Candia, and Hooksett.)[7]

Demographics[edit]

As of the census[8] of 2000, there were 4,843 people, 1,902 households, and 1,253 families residing in the town. The population density was 235.9 people per square mile (91.1/km²). There were 1,962 housing units at an average density of 95.6 per square mile (36.9/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 97.83% White, 0.50% African American, 0.23% Native American, 0.37% Asian, 0.27% from other races, and 0.81% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.18% of the population.

There were 1,902 households out of which 34.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.7% were married couples living together, 10.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.1% were non-families. 27.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.53 and the average family size was 3.06.

In the town the population was spread out with 27.3% under the age of 18, 6.7% from 18 to 24, 34.3% from 25 to 44, 21.1% from 45 to 64, and 10.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 93.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.0 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $41,958, and the median income for a family was $51,659. Males had a median income of $35,520 versus $25,430 for females. The per capita income for the town was $18,851. About 2.2% of families and 3.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.8% of those under age 18 and 4.7% of those age 65 or over.

References[edit]

  1. ^ United States Census Bureau, American FactFinder, 2010 Census figures. Retrieved March 23, 2011.
  2. ^ http://gedcomindex.com/Reference/New_Hampshire_1875/050.html Statistics and Gazetteer of New-Hampshire (1875)
  3. ^ "Town of Hooksett Brief History". Retrieved 2011-02-18. 
  4. ^ "Merrimack County History and Genealogy". Retrieved 2011-02-18. 
  5. ^ "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001) - Allenstown town, New Hampshire". U.S. Census Bureau American Factfinder. Retrieved November 14, 2011. 
  6. ^ Foster, Debra H.; Batorfalvy, Tatianna N.; Medalie, Laura (1995). Water Use in New Hampshire: An Activities Guide for Teachers. U.S. Department of the Interior and U.S. Geological Survey. 
  7. ^ "New Hampshire GRANIT database: Conservation Lands". Archived from the original on 7 June 2008. Retrieved 2008-06-05. 
  8. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 

External links[edit]