Allison Hubert

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Allison Hubert
Allison Hubert.jpg
Sport(s) Football, basketball, baseball
Biographical details
Born (1901-04-06)April 6, 1901
Meridian, Mississippi
Died February 26, 1978(1978-02-26) (aged 76)
Waynesboro, Georgia
Playing career
1922–1925 Alabama
Position(s) Fullback, quarterback
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1931–1936
1937–1946

Basketball
1932–1936
1936–1937
1942–1943

Baseball
1934–1935

Southern Miss
VMI


Southern Miss
VMI
VMI


Southern Miss
Head coaching record
Overall 69–69–13 (football)
35–49 (basketball)
3–12 (baseball)
Statistics
College Football Data Warehouse
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
2 Southern (1924, 1925)
Awards
2x All-Southern (1924, 1925)
College Football Hall of Fame
Inducted in 1964 (profile)

Allison T. "Pooley" Hubert (April 6, 1901 – February 26, 1978) was an All American American football player who played at the University of Alabama from 1922 to 1925. He later became the head football and basketball coach at the University of Southern Mississippi and the Virginia Military Institute. He was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1964.

Pooley dropped out of high school to fight in World War I. He earned a scholarship to play football at Princeton University but arrived too late for the entrance exams. He tried a few other schools before ultimately enrolling at the University of Alabama as a 20-year-old freshman. By the time he was a 24-year-old senior, his teammates had begun calling him "Papa Pooley" because he was so much older than them.

Pooley initially played tackle in college, but was eventually put in the backfield where he excelled at fullback and quarterback . He has been called the "greatest defensive back of all time." The climax of his college career was the final game in which he played a key role helping the Alabama win the 1925 national championship by defeating the Washington, 20–19, in the 1926 Rose Bowl.

He was a college football coach at Southern Miss, and VMI. From 1931 to 1936, he coached at Southern Miss, where he compiled a 26–24–5 record. From 1937 to 1946, he coached at VMI, where he compiled a 43–45–8 record. His 1938 squad set a school record with four ties. His best season came in 1940, when he went 7–2–1.

Head coaching record[edit]

Football[edit]

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Southern Miss Eagles (Independent) (1931–1936)
1931 Southern Miss 2–5
1932 Southern Miss 5–4
1933 Southern Miss 3–5–2
1934 Southern Miss 3–4–2
1935 Southern Miss 6–4
1936 Southern Miss 7–2–1
Southern Miss: 26–24–5
VMI Keydets (Southern Conference) (1937–1946)
1937 VMI 5–5 5–2 5th
1938 VMI 6–1–4 4–0–3 4th
1939 VMI 6–3–1 3–1–1 6th
1940 VMI 7–2–1 3–2–1 7th
1941 VMI 4–6 4–2 6th
1942 VMI 3–5–1 2–4–1 10th
1943 VMI 2–6 1–3 8th
1944 VMI 1–8 1–5 8th
1945 VMI 5–4 3–2 6th
1946 VMI 4–5–1 3–3–1 8th
VMI: 43–45–8 29–24–7
Total: 69–69–13

[1]

Basketball[edit]

Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Southern Miss Golden Eagles (Independent) (1932–1936)
1932–33 Southern Miss 4–10
1933–34 Southern Miss 7–6
1934–35 Southern Miss 3–9
1935–36 Southern Miss 7–5
Southern Miss: 21–30
VMI Keydets (Southern Conference) (1936–1937, 1942–1943)
1936–37 VMI 6–11 5–11 13th
1942–43 VMI 8–8 7–5 7th
VMI: 14–19 12–16
Total: 35–49

      National champion  
      Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion       Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

[2][3]

References[edit]

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