Allison J71

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
J71
F-3C J-71 VF-121 NAN6-63.jpg
J71 engine change in progress on a F3H-2 Demon, 1963.
Type Turbojet
Manufacturer Allison Engine Company
First run 1948
Major applications B-66 Destroyer
F3H Demon
Developed from Allison J35

The Allison J71 was a turbojet engine, designed and built in the United States. It began development in 1948 as a much modified J35, originally designated J35-A-23.[1]

Operational history[edit]

The Allison J71 turbojet powered the Douglas B-66 Destroyer and the McDonnell F3H-2 Demon after the failed Westinghouse J40 proved unworkable. The prototype P6M SeaMasters were also fitted with the engine.

Variants[edit]

J71-A-2
Powers the McDonnell F3H Demon
J71-A-2B
J71-A-2E
9,700 lbf (43.15 kN) thrust (14,000 lbf (62.28 kN) thrust with afterburner), for the McDonnell F3H-2 Demon.
J71-A-4
Afterburning turbojet engines for the Martin XP6M-1 Seamaster flying boat prototypes.
J71-A-6
Afterburning turbojet engines for the Martin YP6M-1 Seamaster pre-production flying boats.
J71-A-9
Powered the Douglas RB-66 Destroyer
J71-A-11
10,200 lbf (45.37 kN) thrust

Specifications (Allison J71-A-2B)[edit]

Data from Gunston.[1]

General characteristics

  • Type: Afterburning turbojet
  • Length:
  • Diameter:
  • Dry weight:

Components

Performance

See also[edit]

Related development
Related lists

References[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ a b Gunston 1989, p. 11.
Bibliography
  • Gunston, Bill. World Encyclopedia of Aero Engines. Cambridge, England. Patrick Stephens Limited, 1989. ISBN 1-85260-163-9
  • Kay, Anthony L. (2007). Turbojet History and Development 1930-1960 Volume 2:USSR, USA, Japan, France, Canada, Sweden, Switzerland, Italy and Hungary (1st ed.). Ramsbury: The Crowood Press. ISBN 978-1861269393. 

External links[edit]