Allium moly

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Golden garlic
Allium-moly.JPG
Allium moly
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Monocots
Order: Asparagales
Family: Amaryllidaceae
Subfamily: Allioideae
Genus: Allium
Species: A. moly
Binomial name
Allium moly
L.
Synonyms[1]
  • Cepa moly (L.) Moench
  • Kalabotis moly (L.) Raf.
  • Molyza moly (L.) Salisb.
  • Nectaroscordum moly (L.) Galasso & Banfi
  • Allium aureum Lam.
  • Allium flavum Salisb.
  • Allium moly var. bulbilliferum Rouy

Allium moly, also known as golden garlic and lily leek, is a perennial plant. This plant is an edible bulb, and it is used as a medicinal and ornamental plant. It is primarily found in Spain and Southern France with additional populations in Italy, Algeria, and Morocco.[1][2] This plant can also be found growing wild in Michigan and Southern Ontario.

The related Odyssey story[edit]

Main article: Moly (herb)

In The Odyssey, Odysseus visited the witch-goddess Circe. She turned half of his men into swine after feeding them cheese and wine. Hermes met with Odysseus and gave him a drug called moly, a resistance to Circe’s magic. Circe, being attracted to Odysseus' resistance, fell in love with him. Circe released his men. Odysseus and his crew remained with her on the island for one year, while they feasted and drank. Finally, Odysseus' men convinced Odysseus that it was time to leave for Ithaca.[3][4]

References[edit]