Allyn Ann McLerie

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Allyn Ann McLerie
Born (1926-12-01) December 1, 1926 (age 87)
Grand-Mère, Quebec, Canada
Occupation Actress, singer, dancer
Years active 1943–93
Spouse(s) Adolph Green
(1945-53; divorced)
George Gaynes
(1953-present); 2 children

Allyn Ann McLerie (born December 1, 1926) was a Canadian-born, Brooklyn-reared actress, singer, and dancer who worked with most of Golden Age musical theatre's major choreographers, including George Balanchine, Agnes de Mille, and Jerome Robbins.[1][2]

Life and career[edit]

McLerie was born in Grand-Mère, Quebec, Canada, the daughter of Vera Alma MacTaggart (née Stewart) and Allan Gordon McLerie, an aviator.[3][4] McLerie made her Broadway debut as a teenager in Kurt Weill's One Touch of Venus.[3][2] She went on to replace Sono Osato as Ivy in On the Town,[5] then created the role of Amy Spettigue in the 1948 Broadway production of Where's Charley? (Theatre World Award).[1][6]

A life member of The Actors Studio,[7] McLerie's other Broadway credits include Miss Liberty,[8][9] the drama Time Limit, Redhead (understudying Gwen Verdon), and West Side Story. McLerie also danced as a guest soloist with American Ballet Theatre during its 1950-51 European and South American tour.

McLerie's best-known film appearances are as Amy in Where's Charley? (1952),[6] Katie Brown in Calamity Jane (1953), Shirley in They Shoot Horses, Don't They? (1969) and as The Crazy Woman in Jeremiah Johnson (1972). Other film work includes Words and Music (1948), The Desert Song (1952), and the TV movie Born Innocent.[10] She enjoyed a long career as a character actress on television, making frequent guest appearances on shows such as Bonanza, The Waltons, The Love Boat, Barney Miller, Benson, Hart to Hart, St. Elsewhere, and Dynasty, among many others. She played Miss Janet Reubner, Tony Randall's assistant, on The Tony Randall Show from 1976-1978.[8] McLerie played the recurring role of Arthur Carlson's wife, Carmen on WKRP in Cincinnati (1978–82). She appeared in three episodes of Punky Brewster alongside her husband, George Gaynes (1984). She may be best-remembered as Florence Bickford, the title character's mother on The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd from 1987-1991. Her last role was on an episode of Brooklyn Bridge in 1993.

Personal life[edit]

McLerie was married to the lyricist/librettist Adolph Green[1] from 1945 until their divorce in May 1953. She has been married to actor George Gaynes since 1953. The couple has two children and are retired in California.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Amanda Vaill (6 May 2008). Somewhere: The Life of Jerome Robbins. Broadway Books. p. 111. ISBN 978-0-7679-0421-6. Retrieved 16 May 2011. 
  2. ^ a b Stanley Green (21 March 1980). Encyclopedia of the Musical Theatre. Da Capo Press. p. 325. ISBN 978-0-306-80113-6. Retrieved 16 May 2011. 
  3. ^ a b Theatre world. Crown Publishers. 1957. Retrieved 16 May 2011. 
  4. ^ http://www.filmreference.com/film/49/Allyn-Ann-McLerie.html
  5. ^ Stanley Green (21 March 1980). Encyclopedia of the Musical Theatre. Da Capo Press. p. 322. ISBN 978-0-306-80113-6. Retrieved 16 May 2011. 
  6. ^ a b Thomas S. Hischak (2008). The Oxford companion to the American musical: theatre, film, and television. Oxford University Press US. pp. 791–. ISBN 978-0-19-533533-0. Retrieved 16 May 2011. 
  7. ^ Garfield, David (1980). "Appendix: Life Members of The Actors Studio as of January 1980". A Player's Place: The Story of The Actors Studio. New York: MacMillan Publishing Co., Inc. p. 279. ISBN 0-02-542650-8. 
  8. ^ a b Hal Erickson (15 June 2009). Encyclopedia of television law shows: factual and fictional series about judges, lawyers and the courtroom, 1948-2008. McFarland. pp. 260–. ISBN 978-0-7864-3828-0. Retrieved 16 May 2011. 
  9. ^ Steven Bach (30 April 2002). Dazzler: The Life and Times of Moss Hart. Da Capo Press. pp. 293–. ISBN 978-0-306-81135-7. Retrieved 16 May 2011. 
  10. ^ Thomas S. Hischak (2008). The Oxford companion to the American musical: theatre, film, and television. Oxford University Press US. pp. 864–. ISBN 978-0-19-533533-0. Retrieved 16 May 2011. 

External links[edit]