Alphabravocharliedeltaechofoxtrotgolf

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Alphabravocharliedeltaechofoxtrotgolf
Studio album by Models
Released 1980
Recorded 1980
Genre New wave
Length 34:18
Label Mushroom
Producer no-one
Models chronology

Alphabravocharliedeltaechofoxtrotgolf
(1980)
Cut Lunch
(1981)

Alphabravocharliedeltaechofoxtrotgolf is the first album by Australian new wave group Models.[1] The title alludes to the first seven letters of the NATO phonetic alphabet. The LP album cover claimed it was produced by no-one, in fact, it was recorded independently by engineer Tony Cohen and the group, prior to signing with Mushroom Records.[1][2] It was released in November 1980, but no singles were released commercially from the album, although "Two People Per km²" and "Uncontrollable Boy" were on a 12-inch disc released to radio stations,[1][2] and a music video was made for "Two People Per km²".

The album was re-released on CD in 1990.

Background[edit]

Models had formed in Melbourne in 1978 by former members of Teenage Radio Stars and JAB. Following some line-up changes they consolidated into Andrew Duffield on keyboards, Mark Ferrie on bass guitar, Janis Friedenfelds (aka Johnny Crash) on drums and percussion, and Sean Kelly on vocals and lead guitar.[1][2] Their first release in October 1979 was a give-away single, "Early Morning Brain (It's Not Quite the Same as Sobriety)" backed with The Boys Next Door's "Scatterbrain".[1] Friction within the band led to their break-up in November, record producers Vanda & Young asked Models to cut some demos - so they reformed at the end of December.[1]

Their second single was another giveaway, "Owe You Nothing," composed of tracks from the Vanda and Young sessions. It appeared in August 1980. In November of that year the Duffield, Ferrie, Friedenfelds and Kelly line-up released Models' first album, Alphabravocharliedeltaechofoxtrotgolf, on Mushroom Records.[2] It peaked at #43 on the Australian albums chart.[3] The album was well received by audiences familiar with the group from the live pub circuit. No singles were released commercially from the album, although "Two People Per km²" and "Uncontrollable Boy" were on a 12-inch disc released to radio stations,[1][2] and a music video was made for "Two People Per km²". The video was directed by Ray Argall as part of a short film about the group.

The band performed extensively both locally and interstate, supporting the Ramones and Midnight Oil on a national tour.[1]

Early in 1981, Friedenfelds was replaced by Buster Stiggs from New Zealand band The Swingers.[2] In June, Models released a 10" album, Cut Lunch, which consisted of further tracks originally intended as demos, produced by Tony Cohen and Models except one produced by Split Enz keyboard player Eddie Rayner.[1][2]

Track listing[edit]

  1. "21 Hz" (Andrew Duffield, Mark Ferrie, Janis Friedenfelds, Sean Kelly)[4] – 0:52 (instrumental)
  2. "Strategic Air Command" (Duffield, Kelly)[5] – 3:01
  3. "Two People Per km²" (Kelly)[6] – 3:12
  4. "Pull the Pin" (Ferrie)[7] – 2:20
  5. "Twice Removed" (Kelly)[8] – 2:55
  6. "Pate Pedestrian" (Duffield, Ferrie, Friedenfelds, Kelly)[9] – 3:28
  7. "Kissing Around Corners" (Duffield, Ferrie)[10] – 3:29
  8. "All Stop" (Kelly)[11] – 3:41
  9. "Uncontrollable Boy (I'm Just An)" (Friedenfelds)[12] – 2:38
  10. "Young Rodents" (Kelly)[13] – 3:38
  11. "Hans Stand: A War Record" (Duffield, Ferrie, Friedenfelds, Kelly)[14] – 1:01
  12. "Happy Birthday IBM" (Duffield)[15] – 4:00

Credits[edit]

Models members

Recording details

  • Producer – no-one; recorded independently by Models with Tony Cohen[1]
  • Engineer – Tony Cohen

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j McFarlane, Ian (1999). "Encyclopedia entry for 'Models'". Encyclopedia of Australian Rock and Pop. Allen & Unwin. ISBN 1-86448-768-2. Retrieved 2009-02-24. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g Holmgren, Magnus; Baird, Paul; Aubrey, Lisa; Acosta. "The Models". Australian Rock Database. Passagen.se (Magnus Holmgren). Archived from the original on 12 June 2012. Retrieved 10 March 2014. 
  3. ^ Kent, David (1993). Australian Chart Book 1970-1992. St Ives, N.S.W.: Australian Chart Book. ISBN 0-646-11917-6.  NOTE: Used for Australian Singles and Albums charting until ARIA created their own charts in mid-1988.
  4. ^ ""21 Hz" at APRA search engine". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 2009-03-01. 
  5. ^ ""Strategic Air Command" at APRA search engine". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 2009-03-01. 
  6. ^ ""Two People Per Square Kilometre" at APRA search engine". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 2009-03-01. 
  7. ^ ""Pull the Pin" at APRA search engine". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 2009-03-01. 
  8. ^ ""Twice Removed" at APRA search engine". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 2009-03-01. 
  9. ^ ""Pate Pedestrian" at APRA search engine". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 2009-03-01. 
  10. ^ ""Kissing Around Corners" at APRA search engine". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 2009-03-01. 
  11. ^ ""All Stop" at APRA search engine". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 2009-03-01. 
  12. ^ ""Uncontrollable Boy" at APRA search engine". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 2009-03-01. 
  13. ^ ""Young Rodents" at APRA search engine". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 2009-03-01. 
  14. ^ ""Hans Stand" at APRA search engine". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 2009-03-01. 
  15. ^ ""Happy Birthday IBM" at APRA search engine". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 2009-03-01.