Alpine, Utah

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Alpine, Utah
City
Overlooking Alpine
Overlooking Alpine
Location in Utah County and the state of Utah
Location in Utah County and the state of Utah
Coordinates: 40°27′23″N 111°46′25″W / 40.45639°N 111.77361°W / 40.45639; -111.77361Coordinates: 40°27′23″N 111°46′25″W / 40.45639°N 111.77361°W / 40.45639; -111.77361[1]
Country United States
State Utah
County Utah
Settled 1850
Incorporated January 19, 1855
Area
 • Total 7.4 sq mi (19.2 km2)
 • Land 7.4 sq mi (19.2 km2)
 • Water 0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation 4,951 ft (1,509 m)
Population (2013)
 • Total 10,024
 • Density 1,400/sq mi (520/km2)
Time zone MST (UTC-7)
 • Summer (DST) MDT (UTC-6)
ZIP code 84004
FIPS code 49-00540[2]
GNIS feature ID 1438174[3]

Alpine is a city in Utah County, Utah, United States. It is part of the ProvoOrem, Utah Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 9,555 at the 2010 census.[4] Alpine has been one of the many quickly-growing cities of Utah since the 1970s, and especially the 1990s. It is located on the slopes of the Wasatch Range north of Highland and American Fork. The west side of the city runs above the Wasatch Fault. The city is so named because when it was first settled, the Latter-day Saint prophet Brigham Young visited and said the town reminded him of the Swiss Alps.

Geography[edit]

Alpine is located on State Route 74, just north of the city of Highland.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 7.4 square miles (19.2 km2). None of that area is covered with water, although a number of small mountain streams run through the city on years with sufficient rainfall.

There are a number of mountain biking trails around the city that attract bikers from all over the state. There are also many trails and paths well suited for back-trail hiking along the mountains.

Government[edit]

The mayor of Alpine is Don N. Watkins. The members of the City Council are Kimberly Bryant, Lon Lott, Troy Stout, Roger Bennett, and Will Jones.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860 135
1870 208 54.1%
1880 319 53.4%
1890 466 46.1%
1900 520 11.6%
1910 585 12.5%
1920 470 −19.7%
1930 509 8.3%
1940 444 −12.8%
1950 571 28.6%
1960 775 35.7%
1970 1,047 35.1%
1980 2,649 153.0%
1990 3,492 31.8%
2000 7,146 104.6%
2010 9,555 33.7%
Est. 2013 10,024 4.9%

[5][6][7][8]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 9,555 people, 1,662 households, and 1,545 families residing in the city. The population density was 992.1 people per square mile (383.2/km²). There were 1,734 housing units at an average density of 240.7 per square mile (93.0/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 97.40% White, 0.18% African American, 0.20% Native American, 0.29% Asian, 0.17% Pacific Islander, 0.35% from other races, and 1.41% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.60% of the population.

There were 1,662 households out of which 63.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 86.5% were married couples living together, 4.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 7.0% were non-families. 6.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 3.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 4.30 and the average family size was 4.51.

In the city the population was spread out with 44.9% under the age of 18, 9.4% from 18 to 24, 23.3% from 25 to 44, 17.0% from 45 to 64, and 5.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 21 years. For every 100 females there were 101.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 99.7 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $72,880, and the median income for a family was $74,891. Males had a median income of $57,250 versus $33,571 for females. The per capita income for the city was $21,716. About 3.5% of families and 3.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.1% of those under age 18 and 9.1% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

Despite being a fairly small town geographically, Alpine is home to four schools. Three of the schools are a part of the Alpine School District, while the fourth, Mountainville Academy, is a charter school for grades K-9. Alpine Elementary and Westfield Elementary are Alpine District Schools for grades K-6. Both of the Alpine District elementary schools feed into Timberline Middle School, a 7-9 grade school.

Points of interest[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]