Alvan Flanders

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Alvan Flanders
Alvan Flanders.jpg
8th Governor of Washington Territory
In office
1869–1870
Preceded by Marshall F. Moore
Succeeded by Edward S. Salomon
Delegate to the U.S. House of Representatives from Washington Territory's at-large district
In office
March 4, 1867 – March 3, 1869
Preceded by Arthur Armstrong Denny
Succeeded by Selucius Garfielde
Personal details
Born August 2, 1825
Hopkinton, New Hampshire
Died March 14, 1894
San Francisco
Political party Republican

Alvan Flanders (August 2, 1825 – March 14, 1894) was a Delegate from the Territory of Washington.

Biography[edit]

Born in Hopkinton, New Hampshire, Flanders attended the public schools in New Hampshire, and learned the machinist trade in Boston. He married Nancy Acorn on June 14, 1848. Later he married Elizabeth M. Smith on December 7, 1855. He had one son, Eddie.[1]

Career[edit]

Flanders moved to Humboldt County, California, in 1851, and there engaged in the lumber business until 1858. He moved to San Francisco. He was one of the founders and proprietors of the "San Francisco Daily Times". He served as member of the California State Assembly in 1861. He was an officer of the United States branch mint in 1861.

Flanders moved to the Territory of Washington in 1863 and engaged in mercantile pursuits in Wallula. He became the first postmaster of Wallula 1865–1867.[2]

Flanders was elected as a Republican to the Fortieth Congress (March 4, 1867 – March 3, 1869). He was not a candidate for renomination in 1868. He was appointed by President Grant as Governor of the Territory of Washington on April 5, 1869, and served until 1870. He returned to San Francisco, at the expiration of his term.

Death[edit]

Flanders died in San Francisco on March 14, 1894. He was interred at Laurel Hill Cemetery which no longer exists, and his re-interment location is unknown.[3] He was related to the political Flanders family of Vermont. He was cousin to; Francis Durrell Flanders, Benjamin Franklin Flanders, and Ralph Edward Flanders.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Alvan Flanders". Washington Secretary of State. Retrieved 10 October 2012. 
  2. ^ "Alvan Flanders". Washington Secretary of State. Retrieved 10 October 2012. 
  3. ^ "Alvan Flanders". The Political Graveyard. Retrieved 10 October 2012. 
  4. ^ "Alvan Flanders". The Political Graveyard. Retrieved 10 October 2012. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]


 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.