Alyson Annan

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Alyson Annan
Personal information
Born 21 June 1973 (1973-06-21) (age 41)
Wentworthville, New South Wales, Australia

Alyson Regina Annan OAM (born 21 June 1973 in Wentworthville, New South Wales) is a former field hockey player from Australia, who earned a total number of 228 international caps for the Women's National Team, in which she scored 166 goals.

Annan was voted the Best Female Hockey Player in the World in 1999.[1] In the following year, lead the Australian team to gold at the 2000 Summer Olympics. She subsequently retired from international competition and moved to the Netherlands. In the Netherlands she played for HC Klein Zwitserland from The Hague. She retired in 2003, becoming the coach of Dutch league team HC Klein Zwitserland. In 2004 she was an assistant of Dutch Head Coach Marc Lammers at the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, Greece, when the Netherlands won silver.

Annan will be the coach of the first women's team of the Amsterdamsche Hockey & Bandy Club during the 2012-2013 season.[2]

International[edit]

Major Tournaments:

Awards[edit]

Personal[edit]

Annan was married to Maximiliano Caldas.[3] Her current partner is Carole Thate, a former Dutch hockey captain and fellow Olympic medallist. Annan and Thate had their first child, Sam, in May 2007.[3] Their second son, Cooper, was born in October 2008.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Alyson Annan OAM". November 2007. Retrieved 10 August 2012. 
  2. ^ "Alyson Annan per volgend seizoen hoofdcoach Dames 1 Amsterdam" (in Dutch). 26 March 2012. Retrieved 10 August 2012. 
  3. ^ a b Hannan, Liz. "[1]". The Sunday Age, 1 July 2007. Retrieved on 18 May 2011
  4. ^ Connolly, Paul. "Back home to show off their boys" The Sydney Morning Herald, 11 January 2009. Retrieved on 18 May 2011

External links[edit]



Awards
Preceded by
None
WorldHockey Player of the Year
1998
Succeeded by
Germany Natascha Keller
Preceded by
Germany Natascha Keller
WorldHockey Player of the Year
2000
Succeeded by
Argentina Luciana Aymar