Alyzia

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Alyzia
Αλυζία
Location
Alyzia is located in Greece
Alyzia
Alyzia
Coordinates 38°42′N 20°56′E / 38.700°N 20.933°E / 38.700; 20.933Coordinates: 38°42′N 20°56′E / 38.700°N 20.933°E / 38.700; 20.933
Government
Country: Greece
Administrative region: West Greece
Regional unit: Aetolia-Acarnania
Municipality: Xiromero
Districts: 5
Population statistics (as of 2001)[1]
Municipal unit
 - Population: 3,759
 - Area: 148.719 km2 (57 sq mi)
 - Density: 25 /km2 (65 /sq mi)
Other
Time zone: EET/EEST (UTC+2/3)
Postal code: 300 19
Telephone: 26460

Alyzia (Greek: Αλυζία) is a former municipality in Aetolia-Acarnania, West Greece, Greece. Since the 2011 local government reform it is part of the municipality Xiromero, of which it is a municipal unit.[2] It is located on the central west coast of Aetolia-Acarnania, near the island community of Kálamos. It has a land area of 148.719 km² and a 2001 census population of 3,759 inhabitants. Its municipal seat was the town of Kandíla (pop. 1,299). The other towns are Archontochóri (pop. 1,046), Mýtikas (846), Várnakas (318), and Panagoúla (250).

Subdivisions[edit]

The municipal unit Alyzia is subdivided into the following communities (constituent villages in brackets):

  • Kandila
  • Archontochori (Archontochori, Agios Athanasios, Paliovarka) [2001 pop: 919]
    • Agios Athanassios [2001 pop: 46]
    • Paliovarka [2001 pop: 64]
  • Mytikas [2001 pop: 858]
  • Panagoula [2001 pop: 282]
  • Varnakas [2001 pop: 389]

History[edit]

Ancient Alyzia was one of the most important cities of ancient Acarnania. According to Strabo, the city was named after Alyzeus, son of Icarius and brother of Penelope (Odysseus' wife).[3]

Famous natives include the regent of Ptolemaic Egypt, Aristomenes of Alyzia (fl. 190s BC).

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ De Facto Population of Greece Population and Housing Census of March 18th, 2001 (PDF 793 KB). National Statistical Service of Greece. 2003. 
  2. ^ Kallikratis law Greece Ministry of Interior (Greek)
  3. ^ Smith, William (1870). "Icarius". Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology 2: 558. Retrieved 2007-08-12.